Alyssa Milano visits Capitol Hill to advocate for Equal Rights Amendment
© Greg Nash

Alyssa Milano made a Wednesday appearance at a news conference alongside Democratic Reps. Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn Bosher MaloneyHouse passes bill to reauthorize funding for 9/11 victims It's time for the left to advance a shared vision of national security: Start by passing the NDAA Hillicon Valley: Appeals court rules Trump can't block people on Twitter | Tech giants to testify in House antitrust investigation | DHS set for grilling over facial recognition tech | Commerce to allow sales to Huawei MORE (N.Y.) and Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierIt's time for the left to advance a shared vision of national security: Start by passing the NDAA Overnight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker House approves amendment to reverse transgender military ban MORE (Calif.) outside the Capitol ahead of her testimony on Wednesday in support of ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).

The “Charmed” actress — a prominent “Me Too” activist — is poised to testify at a Rayburn House Office Building shadow hearing hosted by Maloney to push for the ERA.

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“The #MeToo movement was such a powerful phenomenon because for far too long, women have not felt heard. It’s hard to empower women when they are not recognized as part of our Constitution. Now is the time for that to change and for the ERA to become part of the law for our nation,” Milano, 45, said in a statement this week.

Proponents of the ERA say that it’s necessary in order to officially guarantee equal rights for all Americans, regardless of gender.

Congress approved the amendment in 1972, but only 35 states — three short of the number required to add it to the Constitution — ratified it ahead of the deadline

Congress’s deadline to secure the ERA expired in 1982.

But Illinois ratified the amendment last month, and proponents argue that the 27th Amendment's 202 years between submission and ratification is evidence that the ERA can still be ratified.