Sacha Baron Cohen mulls arming toddlers with guns in inaugural episode
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An array of current and former Republican lawmakers — including Reps. Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherRohrabacher eyes new career as a screenwriter after losing reelection Ryan casts doubt on 'bizarre' California election results Democratic gains erasing House GOP in California MORE (Calif.), Joe WilsonAddison (Joe) Graves WilsonMcCaul set to serve as ranking member of House Committee on Foreign Affairs Republicans jockey for top GOP spot on House Foreign Affairs Committee Trump should stick to his guns and close failed South Carolina nuclear MOX project MORE (S.C.) and former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (Miss.) — are seen endorsing a fake program that would arm toddlers with guns in the inaugural episode of Sacha Baron Cohen’s new Showtime series, “Who is America?”

“You want me to say on television that I support 3- and 4-year-olds with firearms? Is that what you’re asking me to do?” Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzMcCarthy, other Republicans back Ratcliffe to be next attorney general Gaetz goes to bat with Trump on Jordan Soros rep: Fox News refuses to have me on MORE (R-Fla.) asks a gun-loving, Israeli anti-terror expert played by Cohen in Sunday’s premiere episode.

“Typically, members of Congress don’t just hear a story about a program and then indicate whether they support it or not,” Gaetz tells Cohen, who's known for disguising himself to conduct interviews with unsuspecting subjects.

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But immediately after Gaetz’s remarks, several lawmakers are edited one after another, seemingly endorsing a fictional lobbying effort to arm young children.

“I support the kindergarteners program. We in America would be wise to implement it too,” Lott says directly into the camera. “It’s something we should think about in America, about putting guns in the hands of law-abiding citizens, good guys —whether they be teachers, or whether they actually be talented children or highly trained preschoolers.”

“Maybe having many young people trained and understand how to defend themselves in their school might actually make us safer here,” Rohrabacher says in a separate interview.

Wilson says a "3-year-old cannot defend itself from an assault rifle by throwing a Hello Kitty pencil case at it.”

“Our founding fathers did not put an age limit on the Second Amendment,” he adds.

Former Rep. Joe Walsh (R-Ill.) also offers his support. “The intensive three-week kindergartner course introduces specially selected children from 12 to 4-years-old," he says, "from pistols, to rifles, semi-automatics and a rudimentary knowledge of mortars.”

“In less than a month … a first-grader can become a ‘first-grenader,’ ” says Walsh.

Walsh revealed last week that he was one of several prominent conservatives to be “spoofed” by Cohen. Calling the comic a “funny guy,” Walsh said he would “probably end up looking pretty stupid” on the series.

In addition to taking lawmakers to task over gun control, Cohen heavily disguised himself as three additional personas in some often-crude segments.

The British comedian’s first character in the show, Dr. Billy Wayne Ruddick, says he wants to “confront the mainstream media” and “take them down, one by one.”

In an interview with Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersChildren's singer Raffi on criticizing Trump: 'You have to fight fascism with everything you’ve got' Sanders to Colbert: 'You will be my vice presidential candidate!' Sanders: Trump said midterms were about him, and he lost MORE (I-Vt.), Cohen’s character appears to puzzle the 2016 presidential candidate following a back-and-forth about ObamaCare and the economy.

“Why not take the rest of America and put them into the 1 percent?” Cohen asks Sanders.

Appearing nonplussed, Sanders replies, “Billy, I don’t know what you’re talking about. I really don’t.”

The Ruddick role is the same character that former GOP vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin says duped her into agreeing to a sitdown interview by pretending to be a wounded military veteran. Palin slammed Cohen last week, and called on him, Showtime, and CBS to donate profits from “Who is America?” to military veterans groups.

In other graphic segments, “Borat” star Cohen portrays an ex-con who visits a gallery, trying to hawk art that he created with bodily fluids. In another scene with President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoaquín Castro: Trump would be 'in court right now' if he weren't the president or 'privileged' Trump flubs speech location at criminal justice conference Comey reveals new details on Russia probe during House testimony MORE supporters, he crudely describes a “menstrual flag program.”

Showtime has described the seven-episode series as a program that “explores the diverse individuals, from the infamous to the unknown across the political and cultural spectrum, who populate our unique nation.”