Jeff Glor says sore throat nearly stymied big Trump interview
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Jeff Glor’s headline-making interview with President TrumpDonald TrumpSenate rejects attempt to block Biden's Saudi arms sale Crenshaw slams House Freedom Caucus members as 'grifters,' 'performance artists' Senate confirms Biden's nominee to lead Customs and Border Protection MORE almost got derailed at the last minute, not by a suddenly camera-shy commander in chief — but by a sore throat.

“I first started feeling it on like Saturday night,” the “CBS Evening News” anchor tells ITK. “You know when you get a sore throat? So that’s when I said, ‘Oh boy.’”

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According to Glor, there was no Plan B if he ended up losing his voice ahead of his Wednesday sit-down with Trump at the White House.

“I don’t think anyone wanted to consider that,” Glor says with a chuckle. “They kept asking me, 'How’s your voice doing?' And even when it wasn’t doing great I said, ‘Fine. No worries.’”

Fortunately for the 43-year-old journalist, his larynx held up for what was dubbed the “biggest interview” of his career.

Glor’s sit-down — which had been in the works for some time —came on the heels of the president’s widely criticized joint news conference in Helsinki, Finland, on Monday with Russian President Vladimir Putin, in which Trump disagreed with the U.S. intelligence community’s conclusion that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election.

Asked by Glor if he held Putin “personally responsible” for the meddling, Trump responded, “I would, because he's in charge of the country, just like I consider myself to be responsible for things that happen in this country. So certainly as the leader of a country you would have to hold him responsible, yes.”

The vibe at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. on Wednesday was far different than the feeling last week, when Glor interviewed Trump in the United Kingdom for the first half of the two-part interview, he says.

“It was a different tone at the White House than it was in Scotland, which I don’t think is all that surprising, necessarily. You’re in this idyllic scene in the countryside at a gorgeous resort. That lends itself to an airier atmosphere than you might get coming off a couple very busy news days in a room just off the Oval Office,” says Glor.

The news vet says he approached his chat with Trump “the same way I do all other interviews. We do as much preparation as we possibly can. We’re prepared to talk about a lot, understanding that time limits don’t let us talk about everything. But you just have to be prepared for anything when you walk in that room.”

While news from Glor’s big get dominated headlines, at least one critic, CNN’s Jeffrey Toobin, slammed the anchor, saying he didn’t ask “tough questions” of Trump.

“Everybody is entitled to their opinion,” Glor says, when asked about the criticism.

It’s been less than eight months since Glor took over the anchor chair for Scott Pelley on CBS’s evening newscast. He says that as the face of “Evening News,” he’s “determined” to keep up the network’s tradition of pursuing investigative stories.

On Thursday, his broadcast will unveil one such piece — a report on a “pay-to-play surgery scheme” that details allegations of an attempt to push high-priced implant surgery on drug addicts.

“Its marketers who are basically luring in drug addicts and paying them money — in most cases it’s several hundreds of dollars, in some cases a couple thousand — to get this Naltrexone implant. You can guess what addicts who are struggling mightily might do if they’re given a couple hundred dollars in cash, right?” says Glor.

“Those doctors then perform a surgery and insurance is billed for tens of thousands of dollars,” explains Glor.

“It has been described to me as what can be a despicable practice, and I would imagine some people would agree with that.”

Between high-profile interviews, reporting out investigations and manning the anchor desk, Glor has a lot on his professional plate. But, the dad of two young children says he reserves weekends as much as he can for his kids.

Asked what R&R looks like for him, he cracks, “Being yelled at by my children.”

So will Glor be popping champagne bottles after a whirlwind week and two interviews with Trump in the can?

Not exactly, he says.

“Tons of sleep” is what he’s most looking forward to, “until I get my eyelids ripped open by a 3-year-old.”

And, maybe, getting his voice back.

“I’ve been drinking a lot of tea. It stayed at an annoying but serviceable level for the past three days,” Glor says.

“As soon as it hits 7 o’clock on Friday night, the voice is allowed to give out for two days.”