Rosie O'Donnell on Trump's media attacks: 'When someone dies, maybe he'll shut up'

Comedian Rosie O'Donnell warned on Monday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew EPA rule would expand Trump officials' powers to reject FOIA requests Democratic senator introduces bill to ban gun silencers Democrats: Ex-Commerce aide said Ross asked him to examine adding census citizenship question MORE's attacks on the press could lead to someone getting hurt, suggesting that it may take a journalist's death to silence the president. 

"When someone dies, maybe he’ll shut up," O'Donnell, whose feud with Trump predates his political career, said in an interview on MNSBC. She also accused Trump of encouraging political violence and empowering racists. 

"He’s doing dog whistles every day and he’s shouting out to people who try to fight off their own internal racism. He’s encouraging them," she said. "It’s crazy to me, the people he attacks. And someone will get hurt. Someone will die."

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Trump has made slams against the media a hallmark of his political style, frequently accusing news outlets that cover his administration of producing "fake news."

In a tweet on Sunday, Trump accused journalists of sowing "great division" and "distrust," and argued that members of the media "can also cause War."

"The Fake News hates me saying that they are the Enemy of the People only because they know it’s TRUE," he tweeted. "I am providing a great service by explaining this to the American People. They purposely cause great division & distrust. They can also cause War! They are very dangerous & sick!"

O'Donnell's comments on Monday came hours before she planned to lead Broadway stars in a protest outside the White House

She said on MSNBC that she was motivated to join the protest after Trump's highly criticized news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki last month. 

During that press conference, Trump challenged his own intelligence community's assessment that Moscow meddled in the 2016 election, and said that he saw no reason why Russia would seek to interfere in American affairs. 

He later walked back that remark, asserting that he misspoke and that he meant to say that he saw no reason why the Kremlin "wouldn't" meddle in U.S. politics, but his correction was muddled by hedging that the 2016 meddling may have been done by other actors as well.

O'Donnell said that in the news conference with Putin Trump "swore allegiance to Russia," providing on its own enough of a reason for Congress to impeach him. 

"I think Helsinki was the last straw for a lot of people," she said. "You can’t get more blatant than what you did right there. Swore his allegiance to Russia. Not to his own country. And I believe he should be impeached."

O'Donnell has exchanged barbs with Trump over the years. The real estate mogul turned politician has called the comedian a "pig" and a "loser," while O'Donnell has accused Trump of being mentally unstable and unfit to lead the country. 

She denied on Monday that she had ever carried on a feud with Trump. Instead, she said that he had used attacks against her as a stunt to boost his own image.

"People thought we had a feud. I’ve never spoken to the man," O'Donnell said. "He was on my show once as a sweeper when I was making money. But I never spoke to him in my life."