Trump, Obamas and Clintons among leaders mourning Aretha Franklin
© Getty Images

Capitol Hill and the political world is mourning the loss of Aretha Franklin, with President TrumpDonald TrumpKinzinger says Trump 'winning' because so many Republicans 'have remained silent' Our remote warfare counterterrorism strategy is more risk than reward Far-right rally draws small crowd, large police presence at Capitol MORE and former Presidents Obama and Clinton among those saying the “Queen of Soul” will “live on forever through her music.”

Franklin died Thursday at 76 at her home in Detroit, according to a statement from her family released to news outlets.

The “Respect” singer — an 18-time Grammy Award winner — racked up a massive number of hits and honors during her more-than-50-year career.

A Kennedy Center Honoree, Franklin was also the awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005. In 1999, President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonBusiness coalition aims to provide jobs to Afghan refugees Biden nominates ex-State Department official as Export-Import Bank leader Obamas, Bushes and Clintons joining new effort to help Afghan refugees MORE honored the performer with the National Medal of the Arts.

Trump, using his preferred medium of Twitter, said Franklin "was a great woman" with a "wonderful" voice.

Ivanka TrumpIvanka TrumpHouse panel tees up Trump executive privilege fight in Jan. 6 probe Mary Trump doesn't see her cousins connecting with GOP Rubio: Biden's new child allowance is 'first step toward a universal basic income' MORE, the president's senior adviser and daughter, also took to Twitter to praise Franklin's legacy.

In an official statement, former President Obama and Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaWe must mount an all-country response to help our Afghan allies Obamas, Bushes and Clintons joining new effort to help Afghan refugees Bidens, former presidents mark 9/11 anniversary MORE, for whom Franklin performed multiple times, said that "America has no royalty. But we do have a chance to earn something more enduring."

"Through her compositions and unmatched musicianship, Aretha helped define the American experience.  In her voice, we could feel our history, all of it and in every shade — our power and our pain, our darkness and our light, our quest for redemption and our hard-won respect," the Obamas said.

Bill and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonClinton lawyer's indictment reveals 'bag of tricks' Attorney charged in Durham investigation pleads not guilty Attorney indicted on charge of lying to FBI as part of Durham investigation MORE called Franklin “one of America’s greatest national treasures.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“I’ll always be grateful for her kindness and support, including her performances at both my inaugural celebrations, and for the chance to be there for what sadly turned out to be her final performance last November at a benefit supporting the fight against HIV/AIDS,” the Clintons said in a statement to ABC News.

Former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderChristie, Pompeo named co-chairs of GOP redistricting group Democrats look to state courts as redistricting battle heats up On The Trail: Census kicks off a wild redistricting cycle MORE said he was "fortunate to know" the late entertainer "and she was always exceedingly kind and generous to me — for that I will be forever grateful."

Franklin surprised Holder with a performance at the Justice Department's going-away party for him in 2015.

"It is hard to imagine that that unique, soulful and almost otherworldly voice has been stilled. Aretha Franklin made us feel her work, she moved us," Holder said in a statement, adding, "Rest in peace my Queen."

Michigan Rep. Debbie DingellDeborah (Debbie) Ann DingellVirginia Democrat introduces tax credit for electric commercial vehicles More than 100 Democrats back legislation lowering Medicare eligibility age to 60 The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by AT&T - Texas's near abortion ban takes effect MORE (D), who’s married to former Rep. John DingellJohn DingellRep. Dingell hospitalized for surgery on perforated ulcer Races heat up for House leadership posts Democrats flubbed opportunity to capitalize on postal delays MORE (D-Mich.), said “John and I lost a friend” in a statement.

“Aretha’s father was a true friend to John, helping him in his first election and fighting Civil Rights battles together in the 50s and 60s. Aretha was just a friend to me — there if I ever needed her. Aretha was complicated, loving and giving. Faith was important to her and the Church never left her. Her faith in Detroit and its people is what I will remember as much as her voice.”

Praise for Franklin transcended party lines, with senators on both sides of the aisle remembering the music legend.

Lawmakers lauded Franklin’s distinct voice, which she used to belt out hits including “ I Say a Little Prayer” and “(You Make me Feel Like) A Natural Woman.”

Other lawmakers pointed to Franklin's music as a unifying force in an often-divided country.

—Updated at 12:20 p.m.