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Trump, Obamas and Clintons among leaders mourning Aretha Franklin

Capitol Hill and the political world is mourning the loss of Aretha Franklin, with President Trump and former Presidents Obama and Clinton among those saying the "Queen of Soul" will "live on forever through her music."

Franklin died Thursday at 76 at her home in Detroit, according to a statement from her family released to news outlets.

The "Respect" singer - an 18-time Grammy Award winner - racked up a massive number of hits and honors during her more-than-50-year career.

A Kennedy Center Honoree, Franklin was also the awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005. In 1999, President Bill Clinton honored the performer with the National Medal of the Arts.

Trump, using his preferred medium of Twitter, said Franklin "was a great woman" with a "wonderful" voice.

Ivanka Trump, the president's senior adviser and daughter, also took to Twitter to praise Franklin's legacy.

In an official statement, former President Obama and Michelle Obama, for whom Franklin performed multiple times, said that "America has no royalty. But we do have a chance to earn something more enduring."

"Through her compositions and unmatched musicianship, Aretha helped define the American experience.  In her voice, we could feel our history, all of it and in every shade - our power and our pain, our darkness and our light, our quest for redemption and our hard-won respect," the Obamas said.

Bill and Hillary Clinton called Franklin "one of America's greatest national treasures."

"I'll always be grateful for her kindness and support, including her performances at both my inaugural celebrations, and for the chance to be there for what sadly turned out to be her final performance last November at a benefit supporting the fight against HIV/AIDS," the Clintons said in a statement to ABC News.

Former Attorney General Eric Holder said he was "fortunate to know" the late entertainer "and she was always exceedingly kind and generous to me - for that I will be forever grateful."

Franklin surprised Holder with a performance at the Justice Department's going-away party for him in 2015.

"It is hard to imagine that that unique, soulful and almost otherworldly voice has been stilled. Aretha Franklin made us feel her work, she moved us," Holder said in a statement, adding, "Rest in peace my Queen."

Michigan Rep. Debbie Dingell (D), who's married to former Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.), said "John and I lost a friend" in a statement.

"Aretha's father was a true friend to John, helping him in his first election and fighting Civil Rights battles together in the 50s and 60s. Aretha was just a friend to me - there if I ever needed her. Aretha was complicated, loving and giving. Faith was important to her and the Church never left her. Her faith in Detroit and its people is what I will remember as much as her voice."

Praise for Franklin transcended party lines, with senators on both sides of the aisle remembering the music legend.

Lawmakers lauded Franklin's distinct voice, which she used to belt out hits including " I Say a Little Prayer" and "(You Make me Feel Like) A Natural Woman."

Other lawmakers pointed to Franklin's music as a unifying force in an often-divided country.

-Updated at 12:20 p.m.

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