Will Ferrell visits Georgia to recruit volunteers for Abrams's campaign
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Comedian Will Ferrell visited Georgia this week to help support Democrat Stacey Abrams's bid for governor in a hotly contested race against Republican Brian Kemp.

Ferrell was captured on video recruiting student volunteers at Kennesaw State University on Friday to join the Georgia Democrat’s campaign.

Photos also surfaced showing the comedian going door-to-door with his wife Viveca Paulin-Ferrell to canvass for Abrams.

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Earlier this month, Paulin-Ferrell spoke to The Hollywood Reporter about the couple’s decision to campaign for the Democrat.

"We keep asking ourselves, how can we help? What can we do locally being in California? Should we be knocking on doors?" Paulin-Ferrell told the publication. "So we’re going to go knock on doors for Stacey Abrams. You never know in Hollywood if it helps or hurts but we’re trying get out the vote and drive people to the polls."

When she was pressed on how she and her husband planned to use their money to support candidates who their issues align with, Paulin-Ferrell said that she is “on ActBlue all the time donating and maxing out.”

“If there are candidates that I feel really strongly about that are fighting the good fight, whether it be about gun control or the [Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughMcConnell challenger faces tougher path after rocky launch Lindsey Graham's Faustian bargain Liberal, conservative Supreme Court justices unite in praising Stevens MORE] vote, we are there,” she continued. “We want to be active.”

Paulin-Ferrell also added that her husband had recently had meetings with New Jersey Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDemocratic strategist predicts most 2020 candidates will drop out in late fall The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump hits media over 'send her back' coverage The Hill's Campaign Report: Second debate lineups set up high-profile clash MORE (D) and Alabama Sen. Doug Jones (D).

"It's a critical election coming up and you have to care about it and get young people to care in order to use their power of voting,” she explained. “That's what it comes down to."