Chris Rock and Keegan-Michael Key tell black people what to do if they're turned away at polling place
© Twitter

Comedians Chris Rock and Keegan-Michael Key released a video telling black people what to do if someone tries to stop them from voting.

In the 2-minute clip released by NowThis and Color of Change on Friday, Rock and Key discuss the importance of voting and voter suppression ahead of the Nov. 6 midterm elections.

Key can be seen standing alone in the beginning of the short clip, saying: “Hi. I’m Keegan-Michael Key and I’m here to talk to you about the importance of –”

“They know who you are!” Rock says offscreen as part of the PSA-style video.

In another clip, Key begins to recite his lines before the comedian is stopped by Rock yelling, “Cut!”

“More passion!” Rock says as he begins to enter the screen.

“No matter who you are,” Key continues in another try, “or where you’re from, or what political party you’re affiliated with, it’s important—"

ADVERTISEMENT

“Come on!” Rock cuts in again. “What are you doing? Go! Run it! Run it!”

Key goes on to discuss the “efforts underway across America” to keep “certain groups from voting” before Rock again interrupts, asking him to explain what he means by "groups."

“What’re the groups you’re talking about? New Kids on the Block? Spice Girls? 'Groups?'” Rock asks.

Key then goes on to explain he was referring to black people. 

“Well then say black people!” Rock exclaims.

“Black people!” Key shouts. “They tryna keep black people from voting!”

The video transitions to the two comedians telling black voters what to do in the event someone tells them if they can’t vote for whatever reason.

“You have the right to ask for a provisional ballot,” Key says, in the event an election official tells a voter they can’t vote “if your name isn't on the voter roll, or if your name is spelled differently than the identification you have.” 

The video arrives as voter suppression has begun to draw concerns from voters in a number of race around the country, namely in the Georgia governor's race, where Republican Brian Kemp is running against Democrat Stacy Abrams.

Abrams would become the first black woman to serve as a U.S. governor in history if elected.