Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMichelle Obama memoir has longest run as Amazon's best-seller since 'Fifty Shades of Gray' Man who killed teenager who performed at Obama inauguration sentenced to 84 years in prison December sales cement best-seller status for Michelle Obama's book: report MORE on Tuesday, speaking to a group of men of color about double standards, said that people never stopped questioning whether she "could" be first lady.

Obama was fielding questions about how students of color in college can handle feeling that their status is being "questioned," according to local newspaper The Detroit News.  

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"One question you should ask some people who approach you is, why your status is being questioned versus anyone else's?" Obama said during a surprise appearance at a gathering of Wayne State University students. The discussion, which took place at a Detroit museum, was attended by an audience solely composed of men of color, the newspaper noted. 

"Universities are looking for a diverse array of experiences, people who come from different backgrounds," Obama said. "If everyone looked the same and experienced life the same way, what would these conversations be like? Just a bunch of people agreeing with each other."

"You are the person who has to get out of your head," she continued, which has been a theme on Obama's tour for her memoir "Becoming." "Because, trust me, it will continue beyond college. No matter where you go."

"There were people who thought Barack [Obama] couldn't be a good president," she said. "There were people that questioned whether I could be a first lady. That doesn't go away." 

Obama has been making stops around the world for her book tour. Obama's publisher and event promoter Live Nation on Tuesday announced that she is adding 11 more stops to the international tour. 

Obama at a recent event made headlines when she said that it is not always enough for women to "lean in" when trying to find a balance between their marriage and career. 

“That whole ‘so you can have it all,'" Obama said at a book tour stop in Brooklyn. "Nope, not at the same time. That’s a lie. And it’s not always enough to lean in, because that sh-- doesn’t work all the time.” 

Obama's memoir was released on Nov. 13 and has sold more than 2 million copies in less than a month.
 
The publisher of the book, Penguin Random House, announced on Friday that her memoir was the best-selling hardcover book of 2018.