Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris: Trump 'just tear-gassed peaceful protesters for a photo op' Harris, Jeffries question why Manafort, Cohen released while others remain in prison George Floyd's death ramps up the pressure on Biden for a black VP MORE says single women in politics get treated differently than their male counterparts.

The imbalance, the California Democrat writes in her new book, “The Truths We Hold: An American Journey,” released Tuesday, is part of the reason she kept her dating life under wraps before getting married.

“As a single, professional women in my forties, and very much in the public eye, dating wasn’t easy,” Harris, now 54, writes.

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“I knew that if I brought a man with me to an event, people would immediately start to speculate about our relationship,” the junior California senator — who’s considered a potential 2020 presidential contender — says in her book.

“I also knew that single women in politics are viewed differently than single men. We don’t get the same latitude when it comes to our social lives.”

Before she met Doug Emhoff, Harris writes, “I had no interest in inviting that kind of scrutiny unless I was close to sure I’d found ‘the One’ — which meant that for years, I kept my personal life compartmentalized from my career.”

Harris was set up on a date with Emhoff by her best friend only after she promised not to Google the lawyer’s name.

“Don’t overthink it. Just meet him. I already gave him your number. He’s going to reach out,” Harris recalls her pal telling her.

The couple tied the knot in 2014.

Harris reveals in her book that Emhoff’s two children from a previous marriage weren’t keen on calling the former California attorney general “stepmom” — so they came up with a different title that played off of her distinctive moniker.

“Instead they call me their ‘Momala,'” Harris says, indicating in her book that she has a close relationship with her stepchildren and considers Emhoff’s first wife “a friend.”

“We sometimes joke that our modern family is almost a little too functional,” she quips.

The lawmaker, whose book focuses largely on her upbringing and her vision for the future, makes little direct mention of President TrumpDonald John TrumpSessions accepts 'Fox News Sunday' invitation to debate, Tuberville declines Priest among those police cleared from St. John's Church patio for Trump visit Trump criticizes CNN on split-screen audio of Rose Garden address, protesters clashing with police MORE in "The Truths We Hold." She does say Trump was at the forefront of a "race to the bottom" in the 2016 GOP presidential primary and refers to him as a man who "crossed every boundary of decency and integrity."

Harris also recalls watching the results come in on Election Day in 2016 as it became increasingly clear Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSessions accepts 'Fox News Sunday' invitation to debate, Tuberville declines The Memo: Trump lags in polls as crises press Biden savors Trump's latest attacks MORE would not prevail.

"No one really knew what to say or do," Harris writes, as she describes engaging in a form of nacho cheese-flavored therapy: "Each of us was trying to cope in our own way. I sat down on the couch with Doug and ate an entire family-size bag of classic Doritos. Didn't share a single chip."