Georgetown students cheer as Nancy Pelosi demonstrates viral State of the Union clap

House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Bass on filling Harris's Senate spot: 'I'll keep all my options open' Win by QAnon believer creates new headaches for House GOP MORE (D-Calif.) on Thursday reenacted one of the most memorable moments of President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Bob Woodward book will include details of 25 personal letters between Trump and Kim Jong Un On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE's 2019 State of the Union address, prompting cheers from a group of Georgetown University students.

While speaking to a graduating class of students at Georgetown University Law Center about female leadership in Congress, Pelosi decided to redemonstrate her viral clap that was seen as a dig at Trump.

“I don’t [know] if you saw the State of the Union — don’t worry if you didn’t,” she said, referencing the moment when she sarcastically clapped at the president at his call to "embrace the boundless potential of cooperation, compromise and the common good."

But before she could finish her next sentence, she put down her microphone and began to clap, drawing laugher and cheers from the audience.

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After a few seconds, she continued, “The president was almost taking credit for the fact that there were so many more women in Congress.”

“And in some ways, he does deserve some credit,” she laughed, “but he said, ‘Look, look at all these women.’ We were all in white that day, and there they were — 91 Democratic women in white. What a sight to behold.”

“But here’s the thing,” she continued. “Women made a decision to march the day after the inauguration … They marched and then they ran. And women voted, and women won, and now women lead in the Congress of the United States."