Felicity Huffman says she apologized to daughter over college admissions scam
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Former "Desperate Housewives" and "American Crime" star Felicity Huffman said she apologized to her daughter for her participation in the college admissions scandal, in a letter she submitted to the judge in her case, which was published by The Boston Globe published. 

Huffman, one of dozens of defendants in the college admissions scandal will be sentenced Friday after pleading guilty in May after paying an SAT proctor to fix her daughter's scores, CNN reported. She was charged with mail fraud and honest services fraud, leading prosecutors to recommend a month of jail time.

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Defendants in the scandal, including multiple celebrities and CEOs, were charged starting in March with paying large amounts of money to make sure their children got into certain colleges.   

The Oscar nominee submitted the three-page letter to a judge last week to "shed light on how I finally got to the day when I said 'Yes' to this scheme."

"In my desperation to be a good mother I talked myself into believing that all I was doing was giving my daughter a fair shot," the letter said.

"I see the irony in that statement now because what I have done is the opposite of fair. I have broken the law, deceived the educational community, betrayed my daughter, and failed my family."

Huffman started off by searching for a private college counselor to help her daughter, who struggled with medical issues and learning disabilities and aimed to be an actress, she wrote.

She was referred to William Rick Singer, who has been reported to be the alleged ringleader of the scheme.

Because her daughter's math SAT scores were too low, Huffman agreed to have a proctor boost them.

Huffman said in the letter that she made plans to do the same with her second daughter but called it off. 

"When my daughter looked at me and asked with tears streaming down her face, 'Why didn't you believe in me? Why didn't you think I could do it on my own?' I had no adequate answer for her," the letter said.

Huffman said in the letter that she will "respectfully accept whatever punishment the court deems appropriate."