Sotomayor, Angela Davis formally inducted into National Women's Hall of Fame
© Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Sonia SotomayorSonia SotomayorSotomayor breaks new two-minute rule as Supreme Court hears immigration case Sotomayor throws first pitch at Nationals' Hispanic Heritage Day Sotomayor chats with teen star of 'What the Constitution Means to Me' MORE and civil rights icon Angela Davis were formally inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame on Saturday.

ADVERTISEMENT

The hall honored them and eight other women – Actress Jane Fonda, Native American lawyer Sarah Deer, retired Air Force fighter pilot Nicole Malachowski, suffragist and cartoonist Rose O’Neill, New York Congresswoman Louise SlaughterDorothy (Louise) Louise SlaughterSotomayor, Angela Davis formally inducted into National Women's Hall of Fame Seven Republicans vote against naming post office after ex-Rep. Louise Slaughter Breaking through the boys club MORE, composer Laurie Spiegel, and AIDS researcher Flossie Wong-Staal – in Seneca Falls, New York, the site of the 1848 women's rights convention.

Slaughter and O’Neill were posthumously honored. But each of the living inductees reportedly accepted their invitations, The Associated Press reports.

Dr. Sujatha Ramanujan, chair for the National Women's Hall of Fame induction ceremony, said that although the hall does not apply a theme for its nominations, a theme emerged this year that reflected "the political and social mood of the country,” according to the news agency.

“It shows up in the nominations because we ask the general public, and in a time when women are feeling like their voices need to be heard, they’re nominating women whose voices were loud,” she said.

Davis, a former leader of the Black Panther Party who rose to international fame in the 1970s after she was imprisoned and put on trial for conspiracy charges, said while accepting her award on Saturday that her “consciousness has been enabled always by shared endeavors and collective consciousness.”

“At each significant turning point in my life, when I was introduced to the world of progressive political activism, anti-racist prison abolition struggles, when I myself was on the FBI’s 10 Most Wanted List and ended up spending two years in jail and on trial, when I became involved in many international solidarity efforts, intersectional feminist movements, I’ve always been one of many,” she also said, according to the AP.

The 10 inductees join the ranks of 276 other women who have been inducted into the hall since its creation in 1969.