Monica Lewinsky said in a new interview that the House Democrats' impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from the Democratic debate As Buttigieg rises, Biden is still the target Leading Democrats largely pull punches at debate MORE has affected her personally, and that she has “become the punchline of a joke a little more than normal.”

Host Savannah Guthrie asked Lewinsky on NBC's "Today" show Wednesday whether the national conversation about impeachment has been hard on her or pulled her to a “dark place.” 

Lewinsky responded that she has found herself to be more sensitive in the last few weeks, adding that all Americans are affected by the process.

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“Impeachment is a constitutional crisis, right? So obviously it’s much bigger than me, but, am I affected personally? Sure, of course. People are making comparisons to when Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonFeehery: Pivoting to infrastructure could help heal post-impeachment wounds Press: Ukraine's not the only outrage The 2 events that reshaped the Democratic primary race MORE was impeached,” Lewinsky said.  

“I become the punchline of a joke a little more than normal, and I found myself the last few weeks, I’m certainly more sensitive. Some people in my world might say cranky — needed more self care — but I think the truth is like if we’re talking seriously about impeachment, we’re all affected in the country,” she continued.

Lewinsky, whose affair with former President Clinton was at the center of the his impeachment, appeared on the show to promote a new public service announcement targeting online bullying.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiKlobuchar shuts down idea a woman can't beat Trump: 'Pelosi does it every day' Budowsky: Trump destroying GOP in 2018, '19, '20 On The Money: Senate scraps plan to force second shutdown vote | Trump tax breaks for low-income neighborhoods draw scrutiny | McConnell rips House Dems for holding up trade deal MORE (D-Calif.) officially launched an impeachment inquiry last month after a whistleblower raised concerns about Trump's contact with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. During a call in July, Trump pressured his Ukrainian counterpart to launch a corruption investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFive takeaways from the Democratic debate As Buttigieg rises, Biden is still the target Leading Democrats largely pull punches at debate MORE, a leading 2020 White House hopeful, and his son. 

No evidence of criminal wrongdoing by the Bidens has surfaced.