Heidi Klum says she tried to get a coronavirus test: 'I just can't get one'
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Heidi Klum, a judge on NBC's "America's Got Talent," shared an update for fans on Friday saying she has been searching for a coronavirus test but "just can't get one."

The 46-year-old model left during a taping of the talent show this week after she said she felt ill and has since been absent from the competition.

Klum said in an update on her Instagram Stories that she was staying home so she would not infect anyone else if she happened to have the virus.

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"Hi, everyone, I just wanted you to know why I have not been sitting in my 'America's Got Talent' seat," Klum said. "It started all with like a chill, feeling feverish, cough, runny nose. I'm just not feeling good, so that's why I've stayed home, to not infect any other people."

Klum said she could not get a test for the virus despite multiple attempts.

"I hope it's just a cold. I would love to do the corona test, but there just isn't one here," she said. "I tried with two different doctors, and I just can't get one."

Klum is not the only one experiencing difficulties attempting to locate a testing center amid testing shortages for COVID-19.

"There are frustrations with the testing," Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoState Department under fire as 13K Americans remain stranded abroad Senators balance coronavirus action with risks to health Heidi Klum says she tried to get a coronavirus test: 'I just can't get one' MORE (R-W.Va.), the chairwoman of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security, said Thursday.

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioPompeo: Countries must 'step up,' provide 'transparent' coronavirus information to save lives China did not count coronavirus positives if patient had no symptoms: report Trump seeks to sell public on his coronavirus response MORE (R-Fla.) also commented on the issue, saying, "We are going to have — and I suspect are having, and I think they alluded to it in there — a supply chain problem."

Dr. Marty Makary from Johns Hopkins University said Friday that the number of current cases in the U.S. is likely at least 50,000, but the real number is unknown due to the lack of test kits supplied to the U.S. population.

"Don't believe the numbers when you see, even on our Johns Hopkins website, that 1,600 Americans have the virus," Makary told Yahoo Finance. "No, that means 1,600 got the test, tested positive. There are probably 25 to 50 people who have the virus for every one person who is confirmed." 

As of Saturday, the U.S. has tested 2,175 positive cases of the virus, according to Johns Hopkins Centers for Systems Science and Engineering. Forty-seven people have died from complications related to COVID-19.