Zelda Williams, the daughter of the late Robin Williams, hit back at President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden leads Trump by 36 points nationally among Latinos: poll Trump dismisses climate change role in fires, says Newsom needs to manage forest better Jimmy Kimmel hits Trump for rallies while hosting Emmy Awards MORE’s son Eric TrumpEric Frederick TrumpMelania Trump: Ginsburg's 'spirit will live on in all she has inspired' Bipartisan praise pours in after Ginsburg's death Eric Trump says he will comply with New York AG's subpoena only after Election Day MORE recently after he shared a video of her father mocking then-Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden leads Trump by 36 points nationally among Latinos: poll GOP set to release controversial Biden report Can Donald Trump maintain new momentum until this November? MORE in 2009. 

Eric Trump tweeted a clip of Robin Williams’s stand-up making jokes about Biden, with text saying the comedian “just savages” the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee. 

In the 2009 clip, Williams mocks “rambling Joe Biden.”

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“Joe is like your uncle who is on a new drug and hasn’t got the dosage right,” he said. 

Zelda Williams urged Trump to instead look up what her father said about his own. 

“While we’re ‘reminiscing’ (to further your political agenda), you should look up what he said about your Dad. I did. Promise you, it’s much more ‘savage,’” she tweeted last week.

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The "Mrs. Doubtfire" star mocked Donald Trump in a 2012 routine, before the businessman and reality TV star launched his 2016 presidential campaign.  

“This is a man who said, ‘my daughter is hot.’ Even people in Arkansas went, ‘that’s f-----g wrong. That’s just way out of place,’” the comedian says in a video posted to YouTube by SiriusXM in 2018. 

“And that f-----g hair, my god. I believe the hair is the Donald. I believe the body's a maintenance system for the hair,” Williams continued. 

On Monday, a few days after Zelda Williams responded to Eric Trump, she shared a message on Twitter in honor of the sixth anniversary of her father’s death by suicide, saying she will be taking a break from the platform on Tuesday.

“It’s hard for me on regular, good days to remain the person expected to graciously accept the world’s need to share their memories of him and express their condolences for his loss. As I’ve said in the past, while I am constantly touched by all your boundless continued love for him, some days it can feel a bit like being seen as a roadside memorial — a place, not a person — where people drive past and leave their sentiments to then go about their days comforted their love for him was witnessed,” she said. 

She also shared a series of suicide prevention resources.