Oscars announce new diversity and inclusion standards for best picture nominees
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The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced a new set of standards for the Academy Awards's best picture category on Tuesday as part of efforts to improve representation in film for underrepresented racial minorities, women, LGBTQ people and people with disabilities.

A statement on the Academy's website detailed four categories of standards for films, at least two of which a film must meet in order to be considered for a best picture nomination. 

The four standards deal with a variety of issues including on-screen representation for actors and actresses of underrepresented groups in both casting and in the theme or subject matter of films, as well as off-screen opportunities in project leadership positions and general staffing.

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The Oscars "must widen to reflect our diverse global population in both the creation of motion pictures and in the audiences who connect with them. The Academy is committed to playing a vital role in helping make this a reality,” Academy President David Rubin and Academy CEO Dawn Hudson said in a joint statement accompanying the announcement. “We believe these inclusion standards will be a catalyst for long-lasting, essential change in our industry.”

Film submissions for the 2022 Academy Awards will be the first to be subject to the new requirements, the Academy's statement continued.

Tuesday's announcement comes following multiple campaigns aimed at raising awareness around the dominance of white actors and films about white characters in past Oscar best picture nominee lists. This year's Oscars made history when "Parasite," a film by South Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho, became the first international film to win the best picture category.

In 2015, Twitter users created the hashtag "#OscarsSoWhite" in response to a slate of 20 best actor nominees that year which only included white actors, a term that quickly went viral and would trend in subsequent years in response to similar criticism of Oscar nominations.