NBA star Lebron James tweeted an edited photo of President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden and Harris host 'family' Hanukkah celebration with more than 150 guests Symone Sanders to leave the White House at the end of the year Overnight Defense & National Security — Senate looks to break defense bill stalemate MORE “blocking” President TrumpDonald TrumpMedia giants side with Bannon on request to release Jan. 6 documents Cheney warns of consequences for Trump in dealings with Jan. 6 committee Jan. 6 panel recommends contempt charges for Trump DOJ official MORE after the former vice president clinched the race for the White House on Saturday

The original image shows James blocking Golden State Warriors player Andre Iguodala during the 2016 NBA Finals. The photo James shared Saturday shows Biden’s face edited onto his body and Trump’s face edited onto Iguodala’s.

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The Associated Press, CNN, Fox News and other news outlets called the race for Biden on Saturday following days of vote counting across the country. Officials continue to count votes in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Georgia, Nevada and Alaska.

Trump has refused to concede the race and vowed to pursue legal challenges in states across the country. 

The president has regularly attacked James, including over the protests against police brutality that professional athletes have adopted in recent years during which they kneel during the National Anthem.

Trump on Monday lashed out at James during a campaign rally, where supporters responded by chanting "Lebron James sucks." 

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James in 2017 called Trump a “bum” after the president said NBA player Stephen Curry was not welcome at the White House after the Golden State Warriors’ championship victory. Curry previously said that he did not want the NBA team to visit the White House due to Trump.

James shared several tweets celebrating Biden’s victory on Saturday, including a gif of him smoking a cigar. The post tagged the More than a Vote organization, the voting rights group James launched this year aimed in part at mobilizing Black voters.