Former President Obama pushed back in a recent interview against the idea of joining President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation US records 2,300 COVID-19 deaths as pandemic rises with holidays MORE’s White House or Cabinet next year.

The topic came up during the former president’s wide-ranging interview with CBS’s Gayle KingGayle KingCBS News President Zirinsky wins National Press Club Fourth Estate Award The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by UAE - US records 1 million COVID-19 cases in a week; governors crack down Obama said his 'initial instinct' during '09 outburst from Joe Wilson was to 'smack this guy on the head' MORE released early Sunday, during which Obama discussed President TrumpDonald John TrumpVenezuela judge orders prison time for 6 American oil executives Trump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation MORE's refusal to accept the election results, hitting the campaign trail for Biden and his new memoir, “A Promised Land.”

While Obama said he’ll help his former vice president in “any ways” that he can, he said Biden “doesn’t need” his advice. Obama added, laughing, that he’s not planning “to suddenly work on the White House staff or something.”

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King then asked Obama, “No Cabinet position for you, Mr. President?” 

The topic sparked more laughter from Obama, who said in response, “There are probably some things I would not be doing ‘cause Michelle would leave me.”

"She’d be like, 'What? You’re doin' what?'" he said, referring to former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaObama: 'Hopeless' to try to sell as many books as Michelle Obama sold record-breaking 1.7 million copies of memoir in first week Media and Hollywood should stop their marching-to-Georgia talk MORE.

During the interview, the former president also recalled his and his family’s experience leaving the White House in early 2017.

“When the presidency was over, two things happened. One was, objectively, I just had more time,” he said.

"But two," he said before going on to discuss his wife’s experience, "is that she was able to let go of some of the stress of just feeling as if 'I've got to get everything right all the time. I'm being watched all the time.'" 

"You know, her releasing her breath that I think she had been holding for close to 10 years at that point," he added.