Diversity in spotlight at Golden Globes
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Diversity issues were in the spotlight on Sunday at the Golden Globe Awards in the wake of criticism of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) for having no Black members.

Hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler were among those taking aim at the organization’s lack of diversity, with Fey saying “even with stupid things, inclusivity is important, and there are no Black members of the Hollywood Foreign Press.”

“I realize, HFPA, maybe you guys didn’t get the memo because your workplace is the back booth of a French McDonald’s, but you’ve got to change that,” she added.

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Jane Fonda, who received the Cecil B. DeMille Award, used her speech to highlight many of the Black-directed projects nominated, including “Judas and the Black Messiah,” “Small Axe,” “One Night in Miami” and “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.” She also alluded to Micaela Coel’s sexual assault drama “I May Destroy You,” which was considered by many as one of the HFPA’s major snubs.

“But there’s a story we’ve been afraid to see and hear about ourselves in this industry,” Fonda added. “The story about which voices we respect and elevate and which we tune out. It’s about who’s offered a seat at the table and who was kept out of the rooms where decisions are made.”

“After all, art has always been not just in step with history but has led the way. So let’s be leaders,” she said.

The night’s winners included several notable firsts, including Chloe Zhao, who became the second-ever woman to win in the best director-motion picture category and the first Asian woman. The late Chadwick Boseman became the first-ever posthumous Black winner for his role in “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,” winning in the best actor in a motion picture-drama category.

Daniel Levy, the co-creator of “Schitt's Creek” and who accepted the award for best comedy/musical series on behalf of the show, called the win a validation of such principles and a sign the body could do better.

“In the spirit of inclusion, I hope that this time next year, this ceremony reflects the true breadth and diversity of the film and television being made today, because there is so much more to be celebrated,” he said.

The ceremony came after a Los Angeles Times report on the lack of Black members in the secretive body, which numerous actors and filmmakers highlighted ahead of the ceremony. Ava DuVernay, Kerry Washington, Shonda Rhimes and Sterling K. Brown were among those who signed a statement calling for the 87-member body to make improvements on equity.