Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMinneapolis mayor on Floyd: 'Ultimately his life will have bettered our city' Obamas praise Floyd jury, urge more action: 'We cannot rest' Bush says he doesn't criticize other presidents to avoid risking friendship with Michelle Obama MORE says she's not shocked to hear Meghan, Duchess of SussexMeghan MarkleUK government pressured to ease COVID-19 funeral restrictions after photo of queen sitting alone goes viral Prince Harry, William leave their grandfather's funeral together Queen draws attention after seated alone at Prince Philip's funeral due to COVID-19 restrictions MORE, speak out about claims of racism within Britain's royal family, saying that race "isn't a new construct in this world for people of color."

"It wasn't a complete surprise to hear her feelings and have them articulated," Obama told Jenna Bush Hager in a Tuesday interview on NBC's "Today" show when asked about Meghan's allegations.

In a bombshell interview with Oprah WinfreyOprah Gail WinfreyOprah on Chauvin verdict: 'I cried tears of joy' Prince Harry, William leave their grandfather's funeral together Duchess Meghan sends handwritten note, wreath for Prince Philip MORE earlier this month, Meghan and her husband, Prince HarryPrince HarryUK government pressured to ease COVID-19 funeral restrictions after photo of queen sitting alone goes viral Prince Harry, William leave their grandfather's funeral together Queen draws attention after seated alone at Prince Philip's funeral due to COVID-19 restrictions MORE, alleged that racism played a role in their decision to move to California and step away from their duties as full-time working members of the royal family. The former "Suits" actress, whose mother is Black and father is white, said that before her son with Harry was born in 2019, there were conversations within the royal family about "how dark his skin might be."

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"Public service is a bright, sharp, hot spotlight," Obama told Bush Hager, speaking about what first went through her mind after hearing Meghan and Harry's interview, "and most people don't understand it — nor should they."

"The thing that I always keep in mind is that none of this is about us in public service — it's about people that we serve," Obama continued.

"I always try to push the light back out and focus it on the folks we're here to serve," said the former first lady.

Obama has previously expressed fond feelings for Queen Elizabeth II, saying after meeting the royal family matriarch in 2009 that she "liked her immediately." 

In her 2018 memoir, "Becoming," Obama shared how she felt nervous "coming face-to-face with an honest-to-goodness icon," but quickly found the queen to be "warm and personable" as the two bonded over uncomfortable footwear.

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"I confessed then to the Queen that my feet were hurting. She confessed that hers hurt, too. We looked at each other then with identical expressions, like, 'When is all this standing around with world leaders going to finally wrap up?' And with this, she busted out with a fully charming laugh," Obama recalled in her book.

Obama has also praised her "friend" Meghan, whom she described in 2019 as "an inspiration" and a "thoughtful leader who is breaking the mold and making our world better for it."

"The thing I hope for, and the thing I think about is, this first and foremost is a family," Obama, 57, told Bush Hager on Tuesday.

"And I pray for forgiveness and healing for them, so they can use this as a teachable moment for us all," she said.

Buckingham Palace responded to the allegations stemming from the tell-all with Winfrey, saying in a statement last week the "whole family is saddened to learn the full extent of how challenging the last few years have been for Harry and Meghan" and they would be handling the matter privately.