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Prince Charles: Industrial farming ruining the world

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Prince Charles on Wednesday spoke out against industrial farming, warning that the focus on producing large quantities of cheap foods threatened the survival of smaller farmers.

“Around 35 years ago, I set out to show it was viable to adopt a sustainable approach to farming so that we could produce nutritious food without destroying the soil that grows out,” Charles said on BBC Radio 4.

“Year after year, I’d watch with increasing concern as many of this country’s precious landscapes were slowly diminished in the name of efficiency,” he added. “Such has been the damage to the natural systems we depend upon. We must achieve profound and rapid change to reverse it.”

Charles argued that the production of food impacted the environment, which in turn affects the health of people.

“Our current approach will lead to a dead end no matter how cost-effective intensive food production appears to be,” the Prince of Wales said.

Charles touched on the “hidden costs” of industrial food production such as the negative impact it has on rural communities as well as the damage to soil and emissions created by the farming practices. He called for support for “a diversity of farms.”

“If we regenerate degraded soils around the world, we could capture as much as 70% of the world’s carbon emissions,” he said.

The prince previously encouraged people to grow their own vegetables in their garden in radio essays in June in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. Charles has long been vocal about his passion for gardening. The British royal family, particularly Charles and his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, are known to prefer eating vegetables that are grown on their estates.

“The queen loves to eat food from the estate,” former royal chef Darren McGrady told CNN, though he noted that unlike her son, the queen was not particularly passionate about food and prefers simple fare.

Tags farming Food industry Industrial food Prince Charles Rural community U.K.

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