Dolly Parton on Thursday weighed in on the public debate surrounding Britney Spears’s controversial conservatorship, saying she “went through a lot of that” in her own previous legal battle with her former music partner Porter Wagoner.

In an interview on “Watch What Happens Live,” host Andy Cohen asked the country music star to comment on the conservatorship and the "Free Britney" movement.

"Well, I try to not get involved in other people's business,” Parton responded, adding, “I think she is a wonderful artist and I think she's a wonderful girl, and I only wish her the best."

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The Grammy-winning singer-songwriter went on to say, “I understand all those crazy things. I went through a lot of that myself through a big lawsuit in my early days with Porter Wagoner trying to get out on my own.”

“So I understand where she's coming from and how she feels,” Parton explained, adding, “I hope that all turns out the way that it should."

Parton’s legal battle with Wagoner started five years after she announced in 1974 that she would be ending her musical duo with him to venture out on her own as a solo artist, a decision that led her to write the classic hit "I Will Always Love You."

While the two appeared to be on good terms immediately following their breakup, Wagoner filed a $3 million lawsuit against Parton in 1979, alleging breach of contract. 

The two eventually reconciled and settled out of court, maintaining a friendship until Wagoner’s death in 2007. 

Spears’s conservatorship, which appears to have united lawmakers across the political aisle, has gained increased attention in recent months, especially after Spears spoke in public on the situation for the first time last month, saying in court, “I truly believe this conservatorship is abusive.” 

"I don't feel like I can live a full life,” she added, alleging that under her conservatorship, she has been forced to take medication, work without breaks and is barred from marrying or having any more children. 

A judge late last month denied a request to have Spears’s father, Jamie Spears, removed as her co-conservator, though the pop singer’s new attorney, Mathew Rosengart, filed a motion this week seeking to replace Spears’s father with accountant Jason Rubin.