Maloney calls for equal rights for women with Met Gala gown
© Greg Nash

Democratic New York Rep. Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn MaloneyHillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — EU calls out Russian hacking efforts aimed at member states House lawmakers ask Cyber Ninjas CEO to testify on Arizona audit House Oversight demands answers on CBP's treatment of Haitian migrants MORE hit the Met Gala red carpet on Monday night in a gown that loudly called for women's equality.

Maloney's gown, reportedly designed by Antonios Couture, featured the suffragette colors of purple, white and green, and bore the words "Equal Rights for Women" down the side of each shoulder panel. She also carried a bag that read, "ERA YES," an endorsement of the proposed Equal Rights Amendment.

Maloney took to Twitter to explain her look, writing, "Across the country, women’s rights are under attack."

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She added, "I have long used fashion as a force 4 change. As the Met Costume Institute reopens w/ their inaugural exhibit celebrating American designers, I am calling 4 the certification of the ERA so women can be equal once and for all."

The 75-year-old congresswoman has previously used the annual bash to make a political statement, showing up to the gala in a firefighter jacket in 2019 to push for legislation that would compensate 9/11 attack victims and their families.

Maloney was not the only attendee this year to use her red carpet attire to send a message: notably, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) showed up in a white dress designed by Brother Vellies that read "Tax the Rich," and supermodel Cara Delevingne wore white overalls emblazoned with the message "Peg the Patriarchy."

GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (Ga.) later slammed the efforts, tweeting that singer Joy Villa was the "first" to use the red carpet to push a political agenda when she wore a controversial “Make America Great Again” dress and “Build the Wall” dress at the Grammys in 2017 and 2019.

"Perfect embodiment of an American woman who loves her country and America First!" Greene wrote of Villa.