'Squid Game' creator says Trump helped prove world was ready for show
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South Korean director Hwang Dong-hyuk said he had been sitting on "theories" for the show since 2008, when events including the Lehman Brothers crisis and South Korea's economic crisis gripped headlines at a time when he was also personally struggling financially. 
 
He likened Trump to the show's "VIP" characters, ultrarich patrons of the game who wear gold animal masks in order to maintain their anonymity as they watch and bet on the contestants playing games with deadly stakes. 

"Then Donald Trump became the president of the United States and I think he kind of resembles one of the VIPs in the Squid Game. It’s almost like he’s running a game show, not a country, like giving people horror. After all these issues happened, I thought it was about time that this show goes out into the world," he added.

The Korean drama, which has unseated series such as "Bridgerton" to become Netflix's most popular show, revolves around a group of 456 people facing massive debts who agree to compete in a series of simple games in an attempt to win a $40 million cash prize — or die trying.

Hwang also credited the show's rise to "IT giants" such as Facebook, Google and the South Korean platform Naver.

"The concept itself was not realistic at the time 10 years ago. It was too bizarre and people thought it wouldn't be a money-making film, also because it was violent and there would be some issue with ratings and the target audience would shrink," Hwang told IndieWire. "But 10 years had passed and for Netflix, their distribution system is different from films; they have less restrictions, so I could go about my own way of making this film and I felt less pressure about these issues."