Prince Harry: 'Megxit' a misogynistic term
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Prince HarryPrince HarryPrince Harry and Meghan treat Atlanta's King Center to Black-owned food trucks for MLK Day The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats see victory in a voting rights defeat Prince Harry appealing UK government's police protection decision MORE said Tuesday that the British press's phrase "Megxit," used to describe the decision he and Meghan, the Duchess of SussexMeghan MarklePrince Harry and Meghan treat Atlanta's King Center to Black-owned food trucks for MLK Day The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats see victory in a voting rights defeat Meghan getting confidential sum from UK news outlet for copyright infringement MORE, made to step back from their royal duties, is a "misogynistic" term, Reuters reported

Per the wire service, Harry made the comment while speaking via video on Wired's "The Internet Lie Machine" panel.

"Maybe people know this and maybe they don’t, but the term Megxit was or is a misogynistic term, and it was created by a troll, amplified by royal correspondents, and it grew and grew and grew into mainstream media. But it began with a troll,” Harry said.

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Harry discussed the attacks made against his wife in the British press and on social media platforms, referring to a study conducted into the online hate campaign that was released by a Twitter analytics provider in October. The study found that the majority of tweets directing animosity toward Meghan — roughly 70 percent — originated from a group of just 83 accounts.

The Bot Sentinel CEO Chris Bouzy said that the hate campaign was something entirely new to him and that there was "no motive". 

“Are these people who hate her? Is it racism? Are they trying to hurt [Harry and Meghan’s] credibility? Your guess is as good as ours," said Bouzy.

The Duke and Duchess moved from the U.K. to California in 2020. In April, the royal couple did a bombshell interview with Oprah, unveiling many reasons why they had relieved themselves of their royal duties.