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If immigration goes down in the House, the chamber's Republican majority could well go down in the 2014 elections. In the Senate so far, Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - COVID-19 fears surround Thanksgiving holiday Rubio signals opposition to Biden Cabinet picks Democrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks MORE (R-Fla.) deserves high grades for his handling of immigration. Of course, Rubio has said some things I strongly disagree with, but I will cut him some slack as he tries to maneuver Republicans and the Senate toward a responsible position.

The ultimate test for Rubio will be where he, and the Senate, come down on final passage. For now Rubio is doing well, acting like a serious legislator and a political player who understands the interests of his party and our country.

Contrast Rubio with the showboating partisanship of Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzO'Brien on 2024 talk: 'There's all kinds of speculation out there' Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation McSally, staff asked to break up maskless photo op inside Capitol MORE (R-Texas), a man who is strongly disliked even by many Senate Republicans and who gives no evidence of being either a serious legislator or a political player who understands the needs of either his party or our country.

While my guess is that the Speaker privately favors an approach similar to Rubio's and realizes that Cruz's approach could spell political suicide for Republicans in 2014 by powerfully alienating Hispanic voters for a generation, the acid test will come within the full conference of House Republicans.

This is a test House Republicans could well fail. In the House, the final disposition of immigration will probably represent either BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerPrinciples to unify America Feehery: A possible House Speaker conundrum for Democrats Obama on bipartisanship: 'There is a way to reach out and not be a sap' MORE's finest hour or his greatest failure as Speaker. There is a kamikaze caucus of House Republicans that is determined to destroy true immigration reform.

In the end, the Speaker will have to stare them down within the Republican Conference and/or make a side deal with Democratic leaders to pass a bill that many Republican members will adamantly oppose. The political stakes are enormous. 

House Democrats have already begun running television ads in districts represented by Republicans with large Hispanic populations. There are some Republicans with a demographic death wish who persist in alienating waves of female and Hispanic voters, and if they prevail, the Speaker's gavel might well change hands after the 2014 elections.