Trump wins, but is 35 percent enough?
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Presidential candidate Donald trump won the New Hampshire Republican primary, but with 65 percent of the vote against him. (Thirty-five percent voted for him.) Next in the news is the abject failure of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie; ditto Carly Fiorina and Dr. Ben CarsonBenjamin (Ben) Solomon CarsonOvernight Energy: Political appointee taking over as Interior IG | Change comes amid Zinke probe | White Houses shelves coal, nuke bailout plan | Top Dem warns coal export proposal hurts military Overnight Energy: Political employee to replace Interior inspector general amidst investigations| White House pauses plan to bail out coal and nuclear| Top Armed Services Dem warns Trump coal plan on military bases could hurt national security HUD political appointee to replace Interior Department inspector general MORE. They must leave the race immediately. Christie appears to be the first to go; he is returning to New Jersey, where he will presumably suspend his campaign.

Doing well was Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who surprised with second place; an unexpected third-place finish by Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzFive takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's debate showdown O'Rourke's mom discusses past Dem votes after labeled 'lifelong Republican' by son Live coverage: Cruz faces O'Rourke in Texas debate showdown MORE helps him in South Carolina as does former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush's fourth place. Staying in the top tier was Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSaudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP Overnight Defense: Trump worries Saudi Arabia treated as 'guilty until proven innocent' | McConnell opens door to sanctions | Joint Chiefs chair to meet Saudi counterpart | Mattis says Trump backs him '100 percent' Dems can use subpoena power to reclaim the mantle of populism MORE (Fla.), in fifth.

On to South Carolina.

Kasich would make an excellent president and has always been my long shot. He put it all on the roulette wheel's double-zero, looking for the 35-to-one pot of electoral gold. He did well, but does not have significant resources to fight on; he has little if any political infrastructure in South Carolina. He has no major endorsements. The only possible ally in South Carolina would have been Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSaudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP Suspects in journalist's disappearance linked to Saudi crown prince: report Overnight Defense: Trump worries Saudi Arabia treated as 'guilty until proven innocent' | McConnell opens door to sanctions | Joint Chiefs chair to meet Saudi counterpart | Mattis says Trump backs him '100 percent' MORE (R), with whom Kasich served in the House of Representatives. But Graham has endorsed Bush. The only big-name Republican left who hasn't endorsed is Gov. Nikki Haley. My view is that she won't endorse anyone; that will allow her to be in the thick of the vice-presidential selection soup.

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Cruz has been working hard in South Carolina, with staunch conservatives making phone calls, ringing doorbells, collaring people and preaching the Cruz mantra of trying to look different than Trump. Cruz claims to be a real conservative while claiming Trump is not. Trump will have his large rallies like he did in Iowa and it remains to be seen if that will work in South Carolina. His highest ranking endorsement from South Carolina is from the state's little-known lieutenant governor.

But two well-known South Carolina Republicans, Rep. Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyHouse GOP sets deposition deadline for Fusion GPS co-founder Collusion bombshell: DNC lawyers met with FBI on Russia allegations before surveillance warrant Comey rejects request for closed-door interview with House Republicans MORE and Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottOvernight Health Care — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Senators face Wednesday vote on Trump health plans rule | Trump officials plan downtime for ObamaCare website | Lawmakers push for action on reducing maternal deaths Bipartisan group of senators ask Trump to increase focus on maternal deaths 7 law enforcement officers shot in South Carolina MORE, are all in for Rubio.

Rubio was seriously hobbled by last Saturday's debate in New Hampshire; Christie did the damage. Christie's reward? He is now gone. Rubio lost the last-minute deciders, the very group that broke for him in Iowa. He gave Trump the scare of his life there; a handful more of late-deciders and Trump would have been third in Iowa instead of second behind winner Cruz.

For Rubio, the bleeding of support started with the debate and ended when the votes were counted. Saturday's debate in South Carolina will be a new show, most likely without Christie, Fiorina or Carson. Bush, Cruz and Rubio will hit Trump with everything they have. Can Trump withstand a frontal onslaught and attacks on his flanks, too? Despite his first-place showing in New Hampshire, 65 percent of Republicans and independents voted against him.

Can Kasich do any harm to Trump in the debate? Probably not. It's not in his character to slash and burn, nor is it in him to be smooth and use verbal stilettos. Cruz can cut Trump off at the knees if he wants to dissect Trump's simplistic rhetoric.

Rubio can go farther. He promised the people in New Hampshire that he would never screw up again. To live up to his promise, he must draw and quarter Trump on Saturday. Rubio has no choice; he must undo Donald J. Trump to have any chance at going into the Cleveland GOP convention with enough delegates to allow the Republican delegates to manifest party power by denying the presidential nomination to 35 percent of the party.

Contreras formerly wrote for the New American News Service of The New York Times Syndicate.