Ivanka Trump’s apprenticeship program puts American workers first
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In addition to being the leader of the free world, President TrumpDonald John TrumpFlorida GOP lawmaker says he's 'thinking' about impeachment Democrats introduce 'THUG Act' to block funding for G-7 at Trump resort Kurdish group PKK pens open letter rebuking Trump's comparison to ISIS MORE remains the executive producer of “The Apprentice.” While the president is touring states to promote his expertise in apprenticeship programs, his daughter and Assistant to the President, Ivanka Trump, has been making the rounds on the networks to promote an expansion of these programs to help prepare workers for a changing economy.

The theme of the week for the White House is “Workforce Development.” Secretary of Labor Alex Acosta and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos have teamed up with an exceptionally effective spokesperson in the Trump Administration, Ivanka, to promote apprenticeships as a centerpiece of a developing and educated American workforce.

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While many liberal students are preventing conservatives from speaking on college campuses, the president is emphasizing the need for young people to be trained in valuable trades. In one sense, Americans need to look at apprenticeships as a great option for students who want to make more money and develop a unique skill — a skill far more valuable than the lessons many college students have acquired in their art history and political science classes. 

 

According to a USA Today report on June 10, 2017, Ivanka’s pitch is to call “attention to the ‘skills gap’ employers encounter — the difference between what people can do and what employers need — and at encouraging greater use of apprenticeship programs like one she recently visited in Berlin, Germany.” Ivanka Trump makes the case that companies like “IBM, Amazon and Dow Chemical” are working with schools to train our future workforce with skills that will help them get excellent jobs. 

Another company that is leading the charge in providing kids with an education that will prepare them for the information economy is Microsoft. Microsoft has partnered with an organization called Code.org that is pushing our education system to stress computer coding. By helping kids to acquire the tools needed to fill up the large number of jobs that tend to be filled with foreign workers, our nation can avoid importing labor that should be trained domestically.

This is an idea that can help Americans find a job in today’s stalled labor market. Ivanka was further quoted in the USA Today piece as promising the American people “25 million jobs over the next decade in part by increasing women and minority employment in jobs requiring training in science, technology, engineering and math.”

While the talking heads love to waste time by talking about inside-the-beltway gossip, President Trump and his daughter are busy trying to create jobs and make Americans’ lives better.

According to a White House fact sheet, almost all CEOs have a problem finding talent. There are “6 million vacant jobs in the United States, the highest level on record” with “too few women and minorities working in STEM fields.” Although the labor force participation is at Jimmy Carter-era lows, that can change if we equip young Americans with the skills they need to fill high-paying jobs that are currently sitting vacant or being filled with imported talent. The White House cites the fact that certified apprenticeship programs average a salary exceeding $60,000 per year and would provide a $300,000 increase in lifetime earnings for certified apprenticeship programs.

The Obama Administration failed to push these programs with the vigor that President Trump and his administration have shown. These apprenticeship programs are important for the purposes of loading up young people with skills in the modern information age, all the while allowing them to avoid crushing student debt. Even the hardest-core skeptics of the Trump Administration must admit that this is a good idea and the most well-known boss and trainer of apprentices — Donald Trump — is certainly the man for the job.

Corey R. Lewandowski served as campaign manager for President Donald J. Trump.


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