Two House Democrats on Thursday pointed fingers at Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP clears key hurdle on Barrett's Supreme Court nomination, setting up Monday confirmation Texas and North Carolina: Democrats on the verge? Senate GOP to drop documentary series days before election hitting China, Democrats over coronavirus MORE (R-Texas) for the cancellation of the vote on the GOP border bill, which has delayed the start of the five-week-long August recess.

House Republican leaders pulled the $656 million bill after they were unable to attract enough votes from conservative members of their caucus.

Rep. Mark PocanMark William PocanProgressive lawmakers call for United Nations probe into DHS 'human rights abuses' The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Barrett touts independence to sidestep confirmation questions Pocan won't seek another term as Progressive Caucus co-chair MORE (D-Wis.) suggested in a tweet afterward that Cruz is responsible for the divide in GOP support on the bill.

Rep. Jim HimesJames (Jim) Andres HimesOvernight Defense: Pentagon IG to audit use of COVID-19 funds on contractors | Dems optimistic on blocking Trump's Germany withdrawal | Obama slams Trump on foreign policy House panel urges intelligence community to step up science and technology efforts Hillicon Valley: House votes to condemn QAnon | Americans worried about foreign election interference | DHS confirms request to tap protester phones MORE (D-Conn.) later tweeted a rhyme that said the “rest of the day is up to Ted Cruz.”

A group of House conservatives met with Cruz on Wednesday night, and afterwards said they would oppose the GOP border bill unless it ended President Obama's deferred deportation program.

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Without that provision, Cruz argued the bill wouldn’t reduce the influx of unaccompanied children entering the United States illegally from Central America. The border bill would also speed up processing and deportation, deploy National Guard troops to the border and increase the number of immigration judges handling asylum requests.

Lawmakers were scheduled to leave Washington for the annual August recess Thursday afternoon, but Republicans decided they would meet again on Friday morning after a vote on the border bill was canceled.