Democrats largely cheered the Senate vote Thursday to limit filibusters while Republicans charged it was an attempt by Democrats to shift the focus away from ObamaCare.

Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallHispanic caucus unhappy with transition team treatment of Lujan Grisham Progressives urge Haaland for Interior as short list grows Senate committee approves nominations of three FEC commissioners MORE (D-N.M.) said in a tweet “finally, we have reform."

In a 52 to 48 vote Thursday, the Senate approved the “nuclear option,” which changes chamber rules, and lessens the minority party’s ability to filibuster presidential nominees.

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Edging toward the end of the filibuster, Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyDemocrats introduce legislation to strike slavery exception in 13th Amendment Overnight Defense: Defense bill among Congress's year-end scramble | Iranian scientist's assassination adds hurdles to Biden's plan on nuclear deal | Navy scrapping USS Bonhomme Richard after fire Supreme Court declines to hear case challenging unlimited super PAC fundraising MORE (D-Ore.) tweeted, will help the Senate function better.

Some Democrats circulated a graphic based on data from the Congressional Research Service that said 168 presidential nominees have been blocked in U.S. history, 82 of which happened while President Obama was in the White House.

But a slew of Republicans argued Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidFeinstein departure from top post sets stage for Judiciary fight Whitehouse says Democratic caucus will decide future of Judiciary Committee Bottom line MORE (D-Nev.) invoked the nuclear option to change the conversation.

Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrRep. Mark Walker announces Senate bid in North Carolina North Carolina — still purple but up for grabs North Carolina's Mark Walker expected to announce Senate bid MORE (R-N.C.) said the Senate vote will threaten bipartisanship.

“There are no rules,” Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainChoking — not cheating — was Trump's undoing Gabby Giffords congratulates Mark Kelly with throwback photo of her own swearing-in McConnell in tough position as House eyes earmark return MORE (R-Ariz.) tweeted, quoting the late Sen. Arthur Vandenberg (R-Mich.) in 1949, if a majority of the Senate can change the rules at any time.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (Fla.), chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, applauded the move in a tweet.