Senate Democrats block cyber amendment

Senate Democrats on Thursday blocked Republicans from linking a cybersecurity amendment to a defense bill.

The upper chamber fell four votes shy of the 60 votes needed to move forward with attaching the anti-hacking measure to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). While six Democrats broke with the party line to support limiting debate, three Republicans joined the Democrats in opposition.

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCainJohn Sidney McCainBiden falters in pledge to strengthen US alliances 20 years after 9/11, US foreign policy still struggles for balance What the chaos in Afghanistan can remind us about the importance of protecting democracy at home MORE (R-Ariz.) withdrew the amendment after the vote, making the path forward for the amendment unclear.

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Before the vote, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump seeking challenger to McConnell as Senate GOP leader: report Budget chairman: Debt ceiling fight 'a ridiculous position to be in' Buckle up for more Trump, courtesy of the Democratic Party MORE (R-Ky.) implored his colleagues to accept the provision, which contained legislation that would expand the exchange of cyber threat data between the government and the private sector.

“There are now 4 million extra reasons for Congress to act quickly,” McConnell said, referring to the recent digital theft at the Office of Personnel Management.

While the cyber measure itself, known as the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), isn’t controversial, the maneuver to attach it to the NDAA irked Democrats.

Democrats want the chance to offer privacy-enhancing amendments to the CISA, which they would not be able to do if the language became an NDAA add-on.

“There is no good reason for doing it this way,” Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDemocrats say Biden must get more involved in budget fight Biden looks to climate to sell economic agenda Justice Breyer issues warning on remaking Supreme Court: 'What goes around comes around' MORE (D-Nev.) said on the Senate floor right before the vote, calling for the Senate to take up cyber after the defense bill.

“It’s a false promise, its a facade,” he added.

Civil liberties advocates have maintained that the bill, as written, would simply shuttle more sensitive data to the intelligence agencies.

Republican leaders earlier on Thursday said they had no backup plan for how else to move CISA.

Reid promised on the floor that if CISA was taken up separately, lawmakers could get through all the desired amendments in two days of debate. 

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulWhite House debates vaccines for air travel Senate lawmakers let frustration show with Blinken Rand Paul: 'Hatred for Trump' blocking research into ivermectin as COVID-19 treatment MORE (R-Ky.), who boosted the profile of his presidential campaign by breaking with McConnell during the recent fight over surveillance reform, sided with the Democrats in voting to block the amendment.

Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeEconomy adds just 235K jobs in August as delta hammers growth Lawmakers flooded with calls for help on Afghanistan exit Afghanistan fiasco proves we didn't leave soon enough MORE (Utah) and Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerFormer Sen. Heller to run for Nevada governor Democrat Jacky Rosen becomes 22nd senator to back bipartisan infrastructure deal 9 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2022 MORE (Nev.) were the other two Republicans who voted against it.