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Pence denied request to help Carrier in 2014

Pence denied request to help Carrier in 2014
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Vice President-elect Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceOvernight Health Care: Senate to vote on .9 trillion relief bill this week | J&J vaccine rollout begins | CDC warns against lifting restrictions Haley praises Trump CPAC speech after breaking with him over Capitol riot Republican Ohio Senate candidate calls on GOP rep to resign over impeachment vote MORE reportedly refused to help Carrier in 2014 when he denied a request from the company to veto a bill rolling back Indiana's energy efficiency program.

Carrier's parent company, United Technologies — along with GE, Johnson Controls and Honeywell — asked Pence in a joint letter sent in March 2014 to not support the bill, Politico reported Thursday.

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In the letter, the group said that rolling back the energy program would take away about 380 direct jobs and more than 1,200 indirect jobs.

The request was focused on protecting the Energizing Indiana program. The program gave buyers reduced costs for lighting products, free residential walk-through efficiency audits and rebates for installing energy efficiency equipment, according to the report.

"Jobs have been lost and we're not seeing the kind of investment and the kind of energy savings that we saw when we had Energizing Indiana and the efficiency targets in place," said Kerwin Olson, executive director of Citizens Action Coalition, one of the groups that fought to keep the program, according to Politico.

President-elect Donald TrumpDonald TrumpProsecutors focus Trump Organization probe on company's financial officer: report WHO official says it's 'premature' to think pandemic will be over by end of year Romney released from hospital after fall over the weekend MORE on Thursday took a victory lap, celebrating a deal with Carrier to keep more than 1,000 factory jobs in Indiana that were slated to move to Mexico.

Carrier's parent company will receive $7 million worth of tax breaks over a decade as part of the deal to keep jobs in the U.S., while Carrier will also reportedly invest $16 million to keep operations in the state. Hundreds of jobs will still move to Mexico, however.

“I want to let all the other companies know that we are going to do great things for business, there’s no reason for them to leave anymore,” Trump said from Carrier’s plant in Indianapolis. 

“Their taxes are going to be at the low end and the unnecessary regulations are going to be gone."
 
Trump added that the country needs regulations for "safety and environment and things, but most of the regulations are nonsense."