Dems renew calls for gun control in wake of Texas church shooting

Democrats are renewing their calls for gun reform after reports of a mass shooting at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, on Sunday.

Multiple people are dead after gunfire erupted at the church, which is not far outside San Antonio, according to reports.

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Sens. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyPoll: Democrats hold big leads in Pennsylvania Senate, governor races The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh, accuser say they’re prepared to testify Trump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again MORE Jr. (Pa.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinGrassley to administration: You must consult Congress on refugee cap Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Bipartisan group wants to lift Medicaid restriction on substance abuse treatment MORE (Ill.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSenate Democrats increase pressure for FBI investigation of Kavanaugh Poll: Most Massachusetts voters don't think Warren should run for president in 2020 Trump, GOP regain edge in Kavanaugh battle MORE (Calif.) were among the Democrats who urged Congress to act in response to the latest deadly shooting.

"I’m thinking of and praying for all those impacted by the shooting in Texas. In addition to offering my prayers and thoughts I also believe Congress must take action on gun violence," Casey wrote in two separate tweets.

"The shooter turned his gun on people -- kids -- in a place of worship. America is in the grips of a gun violence crisis. Congress must act," Durbin tweeted.

 

Harris, a possible 2020 presidential contender, also condemned “senseless gun violence” after the shooting.

"Enough is enough," Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) said in a series of tweets. "Now is the time for commonsense gun violence prevention steps. Congressional complicity must end." 

Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinGOP, Kavanaugh accuser struggle to reach deal GOP Senate candidate: Allegations against Kavanaugh 'absurd' Grassley panel scraps Kavanaugh hearing, warns committee will vote without deal MORE (Calif.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenMore Massachusetts Voters Prefer Deval Patrick for President than Elizabeth Warren Trump's trade war — firing all cannons or closing the portholes? Poll: Most Massachusetts voters don't think Warren should run for president in 2020 MORE (Mass.) also joined their colleagues in condemning the lack of action. 

“When will this end? When will we decide that we can’t accept massacres in our places of worship, schools, or at concerts? When will we actually do something about it?" Feinstein wrote in a statement.

"Thoughts & prayers are not enough, GOP. We must end this violence. We must stop these tragedies. People are dying while you wait," Warren wrote in one tweet.

Rep. Mike Thompson (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Gun Violence Prevention Task Force, called on his Congressional colleagues to show "courage" and take a stand against gun violence.  

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyWant to improve health care? Get Americans off of their couches Situation in Yemen should lead us to return to a constitutional foreign policy Overnight Defense: Biden honors McCain at Phoenix memorial service | US considers sending captured ISIS fighters to Gitmo and Iraq | Senators press Trump on ending Yemen civil war MORE (D-Conn.), meanwhile, released a lengthy statement in which he called on his colleagues in Congress to hold themselves accountable.

"Ask yourself – how can you claim that you respect human life while choosing fealty to weapons-makers over support for measures favored by the vast majority of your constituents," Murphy wrote.

Witnesses said an armed man walked into the First Baptist Church around 11:30 a.m. and opened fire.

Police have not confirmed the official number of fatalities.

The local news station KSAT reported that the gunman was also killed. 

The attack comes more than a month after the nation's deadliest mass shooting in modern history, in which a gunman opened fire on a country music festival in Las Vegas, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds more.

President Trump, who's embarking on a 12-day trip to Asia, tweeted shortly after reports of the shooting surfaced. 

"May God be w/ the people of Sutherland Springs, Texas. The FBI & law enforcement are on the scene. I am monitoring the situation from Japan," Trump wrote. 

— Updated 4:50 p.m.