Summons issued to Trump in case alleging he is violating emoluments clause

A summons has been issued to President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump takes shot at new GOP candidate in Ohio over Cleveland nickname GOP political operatives indicted over illegal campaign contribution from Russian national in 2016 On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default MORE in a lawsuit alleging he is violating the emoluments clause of the Constitution.

The lawsuit — filed by the attorneys general in Washington, D.C., and Maryland — alleges that Trump is violating the clause, which prevents elected officials from receiving gifts or benefits from foreign governments without Congress’s approval, WAMU reported.

The lawsuit is filed against Trump in his "official capacity and in his individual capacity," according to the Washington, D.C., radio station.

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The lawsuit also argues that businesses in Maryland and D.C. have been hurt because groups instead choose to stay at Trump's properties in attempts to get in his good favor.

Last year, a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit from a liberal watchdog organization arguing that Trump was violating the emoluments clause of the Constitution.

Judge George Daniels of the U.S. District Court for the District of New York dismissed the case on “lack of standing,” agreeing with Trump’s lawyers’ argument that the claims do not fall within the interests of the emoluments clause and should be resolved through the “political process," according to the ruling.

Trump has said his business interests would be put in a blind trust managed by his sons, Donald Trump Jr.Don TrumpHow Trump uses fundraising emails to remain undisputed leader of the GOP Donald Trump Jr. joins Cameo Book claims Trump family members were 'inappropriately' close with Secret Service agents MORE and Eric TrumpEric TrumpTrump Tower debt added to watch list as vacancies rise Sunday shows preview: Coronavirus dominates as country struggles with delta variant House panel tees up Trump executive privilege fight in Jan. 6 probe MORE.

Critics and watchdog groups have expressed concerns that foreign officials can patronize Trump's business to curry favor with the president.

Trump's lawyers must respond to the summons three weeks, according to WAMU.