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Summons issued to Trump in case alleging he is violating emoluments clause

A summons has been issued to President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats slide in battle for Senate Trump believes Kushner relationship with Saudi crown prince a liability: report Christine Blasey Ford to be honored by Palo Alto City Council MORE in a lawsuit alleging he is violating the emoluments clause of the Constitution.

The lawsuit — filed by the attorneys general in Washington, D.C., and Maryland — alleges that Trump is violating the clause, which prevents elected officials from receiving gifts or benefits from foreign governments without Congress’s approval, WAMU reported.

The lawsuit is filed against Trump in his "official capacity and in his individual capacity," according to the Washington, D.C., radio station.

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The lawsuit also argues that businesses in Maryland and D.C. have been hurt because groups instead choose to stay at Trump's properties in attempts to get in his good favor.

Last year, a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit from a liberal watchdog organization arguing that Trump was violating the emoluments clause of the Constitution.

Judge George Daniels of the U.S. District Court for the District of New York dismissed the case on “lack of standing,” agreeing with Trump’s lawyers’ argument that the claims do not fall within the interests of the emoluments clause and should be resolved through the “political process," according to the ruling.

Trump has said his business interests would be put in a blind trust managed by his sons, Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpO'Rourke's rise raises hopes for Texas Dems down ballot Election Countdown: Small-donor donations explode | Russian woman charged with midterm interference | Takeaways from North Dakota Senate debate | O'Rourke gives 'definitive no' to 2020 run | Dems hope Latino voters turn Arizona blue Election Countdown: Florida Senate fight resumes after hurricane | Cruz softens ObamaCare attacks | GOP worries Trump will lose suburban women | Latest Senate polls | Rep. Dave Brat gets Trump's 'total endorsement' | Dem candidates raise record B MORE and Eric TrumpEric Frederick TrumpEric Trump defends father for praising assault of a reporter: 'He can have fun' Eric Trump: US shouldn’t ‘throw away’ Saudi relationship over Khashoggi death Lara Trump says 'Kavanaugh effect' will motivate women to vote Republican MORE.

Critics and watchdog groups have expressed concerns that foreign officials can patronize Trump's business to curry favor with the president.

Trump's lawyers must respond to the summons three weeks, according to WAMU.