SPONSORED:

Carville: Clinton unlikely to run again but she's 'always gotten the most votes'

Democratic strategist James Carville says Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: China implicated in Microsoft breach | White House adds Big Tech critic | QAnon unfazed after false prediction Jill Biden redefines role of first lady QAnon supporters unfazed after another false prediction MORE is unlikely to seek political office again, but remarked that "she’s never run an election where she didn’t get the most votes."

"My guess is, it's not really in her plans right now," Carville told radio host John Catsimatidis on New York's AM 970. "She didn't show any indication that she wants to run for president again. She's run twice, and it's an exhaustive thing."

But Carville, who served as the lead strategist on former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonSenators introduce bill creating technology partnerships to compete with China Edie Falco to play Hillary Clinton in Clinton impeachment series Website shows 3D models of every Oval Office design since 1909 MORE's successful 1992 campaign, also suggested that Hillary Clinton still had potential as a candidate.

ADVERTISEMENT

Carville noted that in each election in which she's competed, she won the popular vote. He pointed to her 2000 Senate campaign, 2008 run in the Democratic presidential primary as well as the 2016 general election.

"I think I've counted something like 16 times in a row that a Clinton has run — either her or him — they've always gotten the most votes, so there's something to be said for that," Carville said.

Clinton won the popular vote in the 2008 Democratic primary against then-Sen. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaWhy is Joe Biden dodging the public and the press? Here's who Biden is now considering for budget chief Pentagon issues report revealing ex-White House doctor 'belittled' subordinates, violated alcohol policies MORE, (D-Ill.) but ultimately lost in the delegate count.

In the 2016 presidential election, Clinton also received nearly 3 million more votes than President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump announces new tranche of endorsements DeSantis, Pence tied in 2024 Republican poll Lawmakers demand changes after National Guard troops at Capitol sickened from tainted food MORE, but fell to the real estate mogul in the Electoral College tally.

Clinton's political future as been a subject of speculation since her 2016 loss. She said in October that she has no plans to mount another run for the White House, but vowed to continue criticizing Trump. 

"I think I'm in a position where my voice will actually be magnified because I am not running," she said in an interview with BBC Radio 4. "And there's a very good basis, as we watch Trump's support shrink, that people will say, 'Well, what she said was right, and now where do we go from here?' "