Carville: Clinton unlikely to run again but she's 'always gotten the most votes'

Democratic strategist James Carville says Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonYang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Top GOP legislator in California leaves party GOP senators request interview with former DNC contractor to probe possible Ukraine ties MORE is unlikely to seek political office again, but remarked that "she’s never run an election where she didn’t get the most votes."

"My guess is, it's not really in her plans right now," Carville told radio host John Catsimatidis on New York's AM 970. "She didn't show any indication that she wants to run for president again. She's run twice, and it's an exhaustive thing."

But Carville, who served as the lead strategist on former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonThe Hill's Morning Report — Pelosi makes it official: Trump will be impeached Impeachment can't wait Turley: Democrats offering passion over proof in Trump impeachment MORE's successful 1992 campaign, also suggested that Hillary Clinton still had potential as a candidate.

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Carville noted that in each election in which she's competed, she won the popular vote. He pointed to her 2000 Senate campaign, 2008 run in the Democratic presidential primary as well as the 2016 general election.

"I think I've counted something like 16 times in a row that a Clinton has run — either her or him — they've always gotten the most votes, so there's something to be said for that," Carville said.

Clinton won the popular vote in the 2008 Democratic primary against then-Sen. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaTeaching black children to read is an act of social justice Buttigieg draws fresh scrutiny, attacks in sprint to Iowa The shifting impeachment positions of Jonathan Turley MORE, (D-Ill.) but ultimately lost in the delegate count.

In the 2016 presidential election, Clinton also received nearly 3 million more votes than President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he will 'temporarily hold off' on declaring Mexican drug cartels as terror organization House Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Artist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 MORE, but fell to the real estate mogul in the Electoral College tally.

Clinton's political future as been a subject of speculation since her 2016 loss. She said in October that she has no plans to mount another run for the White House, but vowed to continue criticizing Trump. 

"I think I'm in a position where my voice will actually be magnified because I am not running," she said in an interview with BBC Radio 4. "And there's a very good basis, as we watch Trump's support shrink, that people will say, 'Well, what she said was right, and now where do we go from here?' "