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Carville: Clinton unlikely to run again but she's 'always gotten the most votes'

Democratic strategist James Carville says Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMedia circles wagons for conspiracy theorist Neera Tanden The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Senate ref axes minimum wage, House votes today on relief bill Democratic strategists start women-run media consulting firm MORE is unlikely to seek political office again, but remarked that "she’s never run an election where she didn’t get the most votes."

"My guess is, it's not really in her plans right now," Carville told radio host John Catsimatidis on New York's AM 970. "She didn't show any indication that she wants to run for president again. She's run twice, and it's an exhaustive thing."

But Carville, who served as the lead strategist on former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonBudget delay is the enemy of defense Americans have decided to give professionals a chance Trumpists' assaults on Republicans who refuse to drink the Kool-Aid will help Democrats MORE's successful 1992 campaign, also suggested that Hillary Clinton still had potential as a candidate.

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Carville noted that in each election in which she's competed, she won the popular vote. He pointed to her 2000 Senate campaign, 2008 run in the Democratic presidential primary as well as the 2016 general election.

"I think I've counted something like 16 times in a row that a Clinton has run — either her or him — they've always gotten the most votes, so there's something to be said for that," Carville said.

Clinton won the popular vote in the 2008 Democratic primary against then-Sen. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaCPAC, all-in for Trump, is not what it used to be Americans have decided to give professionals a chance Artist behind golden Trump statue at CPAC says he made it in Mexico MORE, (D-Ill.) but ultimately lost in the delegate count.

In the 2016 presidential election, Clinton also received nearly 3 million more votes than President TrumpDonald TrumpSacha Baron Cohen calls out 'danger of lies, hate and conspiracies' in Golden Globes speech Sorkin uses Abbie Hoffman quote to condemn Capitol violence: Democracy is 'something you do' Ex-Trump aide Pierson planning run for Congress MORE, but fell to the real estate mogul in the Electoral College tally.

Clinton's political future as been a subject of speculation since her 2016 loss. She said in October that she has no plans to mount another run for the White House, but vowed to continue criticizing Trump. 

"I think I'm in a position where my voice will actually be magnified because I am not running," she said in an interview with BBC Radio 4. "And there's a very good basis, as we watch Trump's support shrink, that people will say, 'Well, what she said was right, and now where do we go from here?' "