House to vote to send 'right to try' bill to Trump’s desk next week

House to vote to send 'right to try' bill to Trump’s desk next week
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The House will vote next week on Senate-passed legislation aimed at making it easier for sick patients to access experimental drugs — a big priority for President TrumpDonald John TrumpAverage tax refunds down double-digits, IRS data shows White House warns Maduro as Venezuela orders partial closure of border with Colombia Trump administration directs 1,000 more troops to Mexican border MORE, Vice President Pence and groups backed by conservative mega-donors Charles and David Koch.

“This will not only offer a chance for the patient to possibly find treatment but could open possibilities to help others do the same,” House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthySteve King says he will run again in 2020: 'I have nothing to apologize for' Steve King spins GOP punishment into political weapon Steve King asks for Congressional Record correction over white supremacist quote MORE (R-Calif.) said in a statement.

“I am proud we will send this historic legislation to President Trump and offer hope to individuals and families facing dire circumstances.”

In August, the Senate passed Right to Try by unanimous consent. The bill, which Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonWhite House, GOP defend Trump emergency declaration GOP senator says Republicans didn't control Senate when they held majority GOP senator voices concern about Trump order, hasn't decided whether he'll back it MORE (R-Wis.) championed, lets sick patients request access to treatments the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hasn’t yet approved.

House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenDems ready aggressive response to Trump emergency order, as GOP splinters Former Ryan aide moves to K street Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Lawmakers pay tribute to John Dingell's legacy on health care | White House denies officials are sabotaging ObamaCare | FDA wants meeting with Juul, Altria execs on youth vaping MORE (R-Ore.) had expressed concerns with the Senate bill, however. He worked to hammer out a different version that, among other changes, further defined the criteria necessary for a patient to be able to receive experimental drugs.

But on Thursday, Walden appeared to offer support for the Senate-passed bill, and laid blame on Senate Democrats.

“It is time for the House to do what Senate Democrats won’t and send a right-to-try bill to the President’s desk, bringing hope to terminally-ill patients across the country,” Walden said in a statement. “I applaud President Trump and Vice President Pence for their tireless support for right-to-try legislation and the patients whose lives hang in the balance.”

In late March, the House bill passed its version of Right to Try in a 267-149 vote, largely along party lines.

The announcement on Thursday that it will take up the Senate's bill comes as congressional momentum had appeared to grind to a halt the past two months, leaving the path forward on the measure unclear.

Senate Democrats last year didn’t object to the bill Johnson introduced with Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyOvernight Energy: Trump taps ex-oil lobbyist Bernhardt to lead Interior | Bernhardt slams Obama officials for agency's ethics issues | Head of major green group steps down Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary EPA's Wheeler faces grilling over rule rollbacks MORE (D-Ind.), which also sidesteps the FDA.

But since the opposition from House Democrats, Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDon’t look for House GOP to defy Trump on border wall GOP Green New Deal stunt is a great deal for Democrats National emergency declaration — a legal fight Trump is likely to win MORE (D-N.Y.) has voiced concerns about taking the FDA out of the equation and objected to a request to bring the House bill up by unanimous consent.

House Democrats voiced concerns about patient safety that were echoed by some advocacy groups.

“By allowing patients access to investigational treatments that have only completed a phase one clinical trial, patients will be exposed to treatments with no or relatively little data that they are actually effective,” the top Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Rep. Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PalloneOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Trump bans abortion providers from family planning program | White House doesn't back GOP governor on drug imports | HHS declines to provide witnesses for family separations hearing Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Top Dems call for end to Medicaid work rules | Chamber launching ad blitz against Trump drug plan | Google offers help to dispose of opioids Top Dems call for end to Medicaid work rules after 18,000 lose coverage in Arkansas MORE (N.J.), said during the debate on the House floor in March.

Opponents of the bill had also pointed to FDA’s compassionate use program, saying the agency approves 99 percent of requests to let a patient use an experimental drug. They also said the bill provides a sense of “false hope,” since drug manufacturers aren’t required to provide the drug to patients who ask.

Supporters of the measure have argued it's safe and that people with a terminal illness should have all tools at their disposal to try a drug that could possibly help them.

“For years, terminally ill patients and their families have been fighting for the right to hope and the freedom to try to save their own lives," Johnson said. "I truly appreciate today’s announcement that House leadership plans to advance this effort by taking up my bill that passed the Senate unanimously."

--Updated at 12:49 p.m.