Koch-backed group targets two Senate Republicans over spending in six-figure ad blitz

Koch-backed group targets two Senate Republicans over spending in six-figure ad blitz
© Getty Images

A conservative group backed by billionaire donors Charles and David Koch is set to launch a new ad campaign against Republican and Democratic senators who supported the $1.3 trillion federal spending bill earlier this year. 

Americans for Prosperity (AFP) is putting six figures behind digital, mail and radio ads, which will drop in the home states of the senators as they return home for the July 4 recess.

ADVERTISEMENT

Those senators include Republicans Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp Trump angry more Republicans haven't defended his tweets: report MORE (Maine) and Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Sanders mounts staunch defense of 'Medicare for All' | Biden, Sanders fight over health care heats up | House votes to repeal ObamaCare 'Cadillac Tax' | Dems want details on fetal tissue research ban Top North Carolina newspapers editorial board to GOP: 'Are you OK with a racist president?' Hillicon Valley: Senate bill would force companies to disclose value of user data | Waters to hold hearing on Facebook cryptocurrency | GOP divided on election security bills | US tracking Russian, Iranian social media campaigns MORE (N.C.) and five Democratic senators who are up for reelection in November in states President TrumpDonald John TrumpCould Donald Trump and Boris Johnson be this generation's Reagan-Thatcher? Merkel backs Democratic congresswomen over Trump How China's currency manipulation cheats America on trade MORE carried in 2016: Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampTrump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand McConnell's Democratic challenger McGrath backtracks on Kavanaugh comments McConnell's Democratic challenger says she likely would have voted for Kavanaugh MORE (N.D.), Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyTrump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand GOP frets over nightmare scenario for Senate primaries McConnell's Democratic challenger McGrath backtracks on Kavanaugh comments MORE (Ind.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillTrump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand Feds allow campaigns to accept discounted cybersecurity services GOP frets over nightmare scenario for Senate primaries MORE (Mo.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinThe Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Health care moves to center stage of Democratic primary fight | Sanders, Biden trade sharps jabs on Medicare for All | Senate to vote on 9/11 bill next week | Buttigieg pushes for cheaper insulin The Hill's Morning Report - Trump seizes House impeachment vote to rally GOP MORE (Wis.) and Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand The Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi looks to squash fight with progressives MORE (Mont.).

“The failure to cut less than a half a cent from every federal dollar spent is indicative of a rampant overspending problem that unfortunately often has bipartisan support,” said AFP spokesman Bill Riggs. “If these senators couldn’t even bring themselves to cut a sliver of unspent or expired funds, how can anyone expect them to take on our larger fiscal challenges?”

AFP is also sending a letter to lawmakers asking that they freeze spending for the next fiscal year.  

Though it has historically backed conservative causes, the Koch network has expressed frustration with the spending bill and the Senate’s rejection of Trump’s rescission plan to claw back $15 billion of it. 

Collins and Burr joined Democrats who voted against bringing the rescission bill up for a vote.

“Four trillion, that’s what Washington will spend this year. So, when politicians like Sen. Richard Burr say they’ll cut wasteful spending, they should keep their promise," a narrator says in one of the radio ads.

"Instead, Burr was the deciding vote against President Trump’s modest spending cuts. A cut of just half a cent for every dollar. Now, Congress will waste even more. Let’s restore fiscal sanity. Tell Senator Burr — stop wasting our tax dollars.”

Last month, AFP launched a similar six-figure ad buy going after 10 Republicans and seven Democrats in the House for their votes on the spending bill.

AFP announced on Wednesday that it would run a seven-figure ad campaign touting Gov. Scott Walker’s (R) fiscal policies in Wisconsin.

The organization also announced it would commit another seven figures to back Trump’s nominee to replace Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who announced Wednesday that he will retire at the end of July.