MSNBC's Nicolle Wallace: I told Jeb Bush 'he should have punched' Trump 'in the face'

MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace said on Thursday that she told then-presidential candidate Jeb Bush that "he should have punched" President TrumpDonald John TrumpREAD: Transcript of James Comey's interview with House Republicans Klobuchar on 2020: ‘I do think you want voices from the Midwest’ Israel boycott fight roils Democrats in year-end spending debate MORE "in the face" after one of the 2016 election primary debates. 

The revelation came during Wallace's "Deadline: White House" program as she discussed the feud between Trump and the former Florida governor that escalated in several heated debates in 2015 and early 2016 before Bush was forced to drop out of the race. 

"Let me tell you, that Jeb Bush moment on that stage, if any of the Republicans on that stage backed Jeb Bush up when he went after Trump and called him out, it would be a very different—," former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele said before Wallace interjected. 

“I told Jeb Bush after the debate that I thought he should have punched him in the face," Wallace said.

"Even if you lost, he insulted your wife, he came down the escalator and called Mexicans rapists and murderers. He said, ‘What do you think I should have done?’ I said, ‘I think you should have punched him in the face and then gotten out of the race. You would have been a hero.'”

 



Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpTrump charity agrees to dissolve amid allegations of a 'shocking pattern of illegality' Chris Matthews: Trump Jr., Ivanka ‘stand as the next dominoes to fall’ Report accuses US tech giants of impeding Senate's Russia probe MORE responded to Wallace on Twitter. 

"Is anyone shocked that the left wants people to resort to violence?" the president's eldest son wrote to his more than 3 million followers.

 

 

Wallace served as the White House communications director under President George W. Bush and in his 2004 reelection campaign. She was also a senior adviser to the late John McCainJohn Sidney McCainThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Flynn awaits sentencing | White House signals it wants to avoid shutdown Arizona gov taps McSally for McCain Senate seat Michelle Obama reflects on 'refreshing' tradition of sharing candy with George W. Bush MORE (R-Ariz.) when he ran for president in 2008. 

But she has been one of President Trump's staunchest critics on MSNBC. 

Conservatives have slammed prominent Democratic party members in recent days, including former Secretary of State and 2016 presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonRoger Stone fundraising off promise not to testify against Trump Rivaling chants of 'USA,' 'lock him up' greet Flynn after sentencing hearing The Hill's 12:30 Report — Flynn awaits sentencing | White House signals it wants to avoid shutdown MORE and former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderEric Holder-backed group sues Wisconsin over early-voting limits New Jersey redistricting reform blasted as gerrymandering power grab Trump attorney general pick a prolific donor to GOP candidates, groups: report MORE, for public comments that they said could incite violence.

On Tuesday, Clinton told CNN that "the time for civility is over" when confronting the GOP, while Holder, who is mulling a 2020 presidential run, said when Republicans go low, "we kick them," in reference to former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMichelle Obama reflects on 'refreshing' tradition of sharing candy with George W. Bush Regina King says she'd be honored to portray Michelle Obama in a movie Michelle Obama jokes Barack's message of hope began with being late for dinner MORE who once said, "When they go low, we go high."

Democrats argue the president has not been exemplary in its rhetoric, pointing to Trump supporters earlier in the week chanting "Lock her up," when he broached Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDemocrats will fail if they portray William Barr as controversial pick Senate Dems urge Trump to continue nuclear arms control negotiations after treaty suspension Senate Intel leaders ask judge not to jail former aide amid leak investigation MORE's (D-Calif.) role in Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughDemocrats will fail if they portray William Barr as controversial pick ‘Justice’ selected as Merriam-Webster’s 2018 word of the year Chief justice of California Supreme Court leaves GOP over Kavanaugh confirmation MORE's confirmation process during a rally earlier this week.