MSNBC's Nicolle Wallace: I told Jeb Bush 'he should have punched' Trump 'in the face'

MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace said on Thursday that she told then-presidential candidate Jeb Bush that "he should have punched" President TrumpDonald John TrumpBill Kristol resurfaces video of Pence calling Obama executive action on immigration a 'profound mistake' ACLU says planned national emergency declaration is 'clear abuse of presidential power' O'Rourke says he'd 'absolutely' take down border wall near El Paso if he could MORE "in the face" after one of the 2016 election primary debates. 

The revelation came during Wallace's "Deadline: White House" program as she discussed the feud between Trump and the former Florida governor that escalated in several heated debates in 2015 and early 2016 before Bush was forced to drop out of the race. 

"Let me tell you, that Jeb Bush moment on that stage, if any of the Republicans on that stage backed Jeb Bush up when he went after Trump and called him out, it would be a very different—," former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele said before Wallace interjected. 

“I told Jeb Bush after the debate that I thought he should have punched him in the face," Wallace said.

"Even if you lost, he insulted your wife, he came down the escalator and called Mexicans rapists and murderers. He said, ‘What do you think I should have done?’ I said, ‘I think you should have punched him in the face and then gotten out of the race. You would have been a hero.'”

 



Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpTrump Organization drops plans to open new hotels amid scrutiny: report Drama hits Senate Intel panel’s Russia inquiry Schultz won't say if he will sell all Starbucks shares if he becomes president MORE responded to Wallace on Twitter. 

"Is anyone shocked that the left wants people to resort to violence?" the president's eldest son wrote to his more than 3 million followers.

 

 

Wallace served as the White House communications director under President George W. Bush and in his 2004 reelection campaign. She was also a senior adviser to the late John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers wait for Trump's next move on border deal Mark Kelly launches Senate bid in Arizona MORE (R-Ariz.) when he ran for president in 2008. 

But she has been one of President Trump's staunchest critics on MSNBC. 

Conservatives have slammed prominent Democratic party members in recent days, including former Secretary of State and 2016 presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonO’Rourke heading to Wisconsin amid 2020 speculation The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers scramble as shutdown deadline nears Exclusive: Biden almost certain to enter 2020 race MORE and former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderOcasio-Cortez to be first guest on new Desus and Mero show Holder says he will make 2020 decision in coming weeks Holder: If Trump directed Cohen to lie, impeachment proceedings ‘must begin’ MORE, for public comments that they said could incite violence.

On Tuesday, Clinton told CNN that "the time for civility is over" when confronting the GOP, while Holder, who is mulling a 2020 presidential run, said when Republicans go low, "we kick them," in reference to former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaGOP senator dedicates heart photo to wife from Senate floor for Valentine's Day Barack Obama sends Valentine's message to Michelle: 'She does get down to Motown' The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — House moving to vote on deal after signals Trump will sign MORE who once said, "When they go low, we go high."

Democrats argue the president has not been exemplary in its rhetoric, pointing to Trump supporters earlier in the week chanting "Lock her up," when he broached Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFeinstein says she thinks Biden will run after meeting with him Trump judicial nominee Neomi Rao seeks to clarify past remarks on date rape Bottom Line MORE's (D-Calif.) role in Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughDems escalate gun fight a year after Parkland Virginia political scandals show why words, and their delivery, truly matter In Virginia, due process should count more than blind team support MORE's confirmation process during a rally earlier this week.