MSNBC's Nicolle Wallace: I told Jeb Bush 'he should have punched' Trump 'in the face'

MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace said on Thursday that she told then-presidential candidate Jeb Bush that "he should have punched" President TrumpDonald John Trump Former US ambassador: 'Denmark is not a big fan of Donald Trump and his politics' Senate Democrats push for arms control language in defense policy bill Detroit county sheriff endorses Booker for president MORE "in the face" after one of the 2016 election primary debates. 

The revelation came during Wallace's "Deadline: White House" program as she discussed the feud between Trump and the former Florida governor that escalated in several heated debates in 2015 and early 2016 before Bush was forced to drop out of the race. 

"Let me tell you, that Jeb Bush moment on that stage, if any of the Republicans on that stage backed Jeb Bush up when he went after Trump and called him out, it would be a very different—," former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele said before Wallace interjected. 

“I told Jeb Bush after the debate that I thought he should have punched him in the face," Wallace said.

"Even if you lost, he insulted your wife, he came down the escalator and called Mexicans rapists and murderers. He said, ‘What do you think I should have done?’ I said, ‘I think you should have punched him in the face and then gotten out of the race. You would have been a hero.'”

 



Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpPETA billboard in Baltimore calls Kushner a 'rich pest' Dick Cheney to attend fundraiser supporting Trump reelection: report House chairman warns foreign governments to 'cease and desist' spending money at Trump properties MORE responded to Wallace on Twitter. 

"Is anyone shocked that the left wants people to resort to violence?" the president's eldest son wrote to his more than 3 million followers.

 

 

Wallace served as the White House communications director under President George W. Bush and in his 2004 reelection campaign. She was also a senior adviser to the late John McCainJohn Sidney McCainCindy McCain says no one in Republican Party carries 'voice of reason' after husband's death Anti-gun violence organization endorses Kelly's Senate bid McCain's family, McCain Institute to promote #ActsOfCivility in marking first anniversary of senator's death MORE (R-Ariz.) when he ran for president in 2008. 

But she has been one of President Trump's staunchest critics on MSNBC. 

Conservatives have slammed prominent Democratic party members in recent days, including former Secretary of State and 2016 presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Memo: Polls flash warning signs for Trump Polls suggest Sanders may be underestimated 10 declassified Russia collusion revelations that could rock Washington this fall MORE and former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderJuan Williams: Democrats finally hit Trump where it hurts GOP governor vetoes New Hampshire bill to create independent redistricting commission Why target Tucker Carlson? It's part of the left's war on the right MORE, for public comments that they said could incite violence.

On Tuesday, Clinton told CNN that "the time for civility is over" when confronting the GOP, while Holder, who is mulling a 2020 presidential run, said when Republicans go low, "we kick them," in reference to former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaJuan Williams: Democrats finally hit Trump where it hurts Michelle Obama to present Lin-Manuel Miranda with the Portrait of a Nation Prize Michelle Obama thanks her high school for naming new athletic complex after her MORE who once said, "When they go low, we go high."

Democrats argue the president has not been exemplary in its rhetoric, pointing to Trump supporters earlier in the week chanting "Lock her up," when he broached Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTrump administration urges Congress to reauthorize NSA surveillance program The Hill's Morning Report - More talk on guns; many questions on Epstein's death Juan Williams: We need a backlash against Big Tech MORE's (D-Calif.) role in Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughCollins downplays 2020 threat: 'Confident' re-election would go well if she runs The exhaustion of Democrats' anti-Trump delusions Lewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' MORE's confirmation process during a rally earlier this week.