MSNBC's Nicolle Wallace: I told Jeb Bush 'he should have punched' Trump 'in the face'

MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace said on Thursday that she told then-presidential candidate Jeb Bush that "he should have punched" President TrumpDonald John TrumpPapadopoulos on AG's new powers: 'Trump is now on the offense' Pelosi uses Trump to her advantage Mike Pence delivers West Point commencement address MORE "in the face" after one of the 2016 election primary debates. 

The revelation came during Wallace's "Deadline: White House" program as she discussed the feud between Trump and the former Florida governor that escalated in several heated debates in 2015 and early 2016 before Bush was forced to drop out of the race. 

"Let me tell you, that Jeb Bush moment on that stage, if any of the Republicans on that stage backed Jeb Bush up when he went after Trump and called him out, it would be a very different—," former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele said before Wallace interjected. 

“I told Jeb Bush after the debate that I thought he should have punched him in the face," Wallace said.

"Even if you lost, he insulted your wife, he came down the escalator and called Mexicans rapists and murderers. He said, ‘What do you think I should have done?’ I said, ‘I think you should have punched him in the face and then gotten out of the race. You would have been a hero.'”

 



Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpTrump Jr. slams Republican committee chairman: 'Too weak to stand up to the Democrats' #TrumpTantrum spreads on Twitter after impromptu press conference Trump family members will join state visit to UK MORE responded to Wallace on Twitter. 

"Is anyone shocked that the left wants people to resort to violence?" the president's eldest son wrote to his more than 3 million followers.

 

 

Wallace served as the White House communications director under President George W. Bush and in his 2004 reelection campaign. She was also a senior adviser to the late John McCainJohn Sidney McCainClimate change is a GOP issue, too It's Joe Biden's 2020 presidential nomination to lose Meghan McCain on Pelosi-Trump feud: 'Put this crap aside' and 'work together for America' MORE (R-Ariz.) when he ran for president in 2008. 

But she has been one of President Trump's staunchest critics on MSNBC. 

Conservatives have slammed prominent Democratic party members in recent days, including former Secretary of State and 2016 presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton2020 Democrats target federal ban on abortion funding Hillary Clinton slams Trump for spreading 'sexist trash' about Pelosi Gillibrand seizes on abortion debate to jump-start campaign MORE and former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderEric Holder: 'There are grounds for impeachment' in Mueller report Prosecutor appointed by Barr poised to enter Washington firestorm Dems struggle to make Trump bend on probes MORE, for public comments that they said could incite violence.

On Tuesday, Clinton told CNN that "the time for civility is over" when confronting the GOP, while Holder, who is mulling a 2020 presidential run, said when Republicans go low, "we kick them," in reference to former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaTrump to meet with Prince Harry during UK visit Michelle Obama to headline Essence Festival Obama shares tribute to Michelle to celebrate Mother's Day MORE who once said, "When they go low, we go high."

Democrats argue the president has not been exemplary in its rhetoric, pointing to Trump supporters earlier in the week chanting "Lock her up," when he broached Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFive takeaways from Barr's new powers in 'spying' probe Senate Democrats to House: Tamp down the impeachment talk Feinstein, Iranian foreign minister had dinner amid tensions: report MORE's (D-Calif.) role in Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughMurkowski celebrates birthday with electric scooter ride Graham urges Trump not to abandon infrastructure talks with Democrats 2020 Dems break political taboos by endorsing litmus tests MORE's confirmation process during a rally earlier this week.