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MSNBC's Nicolle Wallace: I told Jeb Bush 'he should have punched' Trump 'in the face'

MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace said on Thursday that she told then-presidential candidate Jeb Bush that "he should have punched" President TrumpDonald John TrumpKey takeaways from the Arizona Senate debate Major Hollywood talent firm considering rejecting Saudi investment money: report Mattis says he thought 'nothing at all' about Trump saying he may leave administration MORE "in the face" after one of the 2016 election primary debates. 

The revelation came during Wallace's "Deadline: White House" program as she discussed the feud between Trump and the former Florida governor that escalated in several heated debates in 2015 and early 2016 before Bush was forced to drop out of the race. 

"Let me tell you, that Jeb Bush moment on that stage, if any of the Republicans on that stage backed Jeb Bush up when he went after Trump and called him out, it would be a very different—," former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele said before Wallace interjected. 

“I told Jeb Bush after the debate that I thought he should have punched him in the face," Wallace said.

"Even if you lost, he insulted your wife, he came down the escalator and called Mexicans rapists and murderers. He said, ‘What do you think I should have done?’ I said, ‘I think you should have punched him in the face and then gotten out of the race. You would have been a hero.'”

 



Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpDems fear party is headed to gutter from Avenatti’s sledgehammer approach Trump Jr. to stump in Indiana for Pence’s brother and governor hopeful Donald Trump Jr. blasts Beto O’Rourke: ‘Irish guy pretending to be Hispanic’ MORE responded to Wallace on Twitter. 

"Is anyone shocked that the left wants people to resort to violence?" the president's eldest son wrote to his more than 3 million followers.

 

 

Wallace served as the White House communications director under President George W. Bush and in his 2004 reelection campaign. She was also a senior adviser to the late John McCainJohn Sidney McCainLive coverage: McSally clashes with Sinema in Arizona Senate debate Is there difference between good and bad online election targeting? Murkowski not worried about a Palin challenge MORE (R-Ariz.) when he ran for president in 2008. 

But she has been one of President Trump's staunchest critics on MSNBC. 

Conservatives have slammed prominent Democratic party members in recent days, including former Secretary of State and 2016 presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCarter Page files defamation lawsuit against DNC Dems fear party is headed to gutter from Avenatti’s sledgehammer approach Election Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight MORE and former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderFormer Clinton aide Reines: ‘Party of snowflakes’ suddenly remodeled as 'angry mob of terrorists’ Noisy democracy, or rude people behaving like children? Georgia gubernatorial candidate calls Holder comments on kicking Republicans ‘hyperbole’ MORE, for public comments that they said could incite violence.

On Tuesday, Clinton told CNN that "the time for civility is over" when confronting the GOP, while Holder, who is mulling a 2020 presidential run, said when Republicans go low, "we kick them," in reference to former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMinnesota GOP Senate candidate compared Michelle Obama to a chimp in Facebook post Former Clinton aide Reines: ‘Party of snowflakes’ suddenly remodeled as 'angry mob of terrorists’ Noisy democracy, or rude people behaving like children? MORE who once said, "When they go low, we go high."

Democrats argue the president has not been exemplary in its rhetoric, pointing to Trump supporters earlier in the week chanting "Lock her up," when he broached Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinAmerican Bar Association dropping Kavanaugh review Juan Williams: Trump, the Great Destroyer Top Judiciary Dems call for unredacted 'zero tolerance' memo MORE's (D-Calif.) role in Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughLive coverage: McSally clashes with Sinema in Arizona Senate debate Dems fear party is headed to gutter from Avenatti’s sledgehammer approach Election Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight MORE's confirmation process during a rally earlier this week.