House Dems worry about lack of women of color in leadership

While House Democrats elected to its leadership ranks this week three females, two African-Americans, one Latino, one Asian-American and a member of the LGBT community, one category was missing: women of color.

Two black females, Reps. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeDeLauro enters race to succeed Lowey as Appropriations chief The 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment Lawmakers mourn death of 'Julia' star Diahann Carroll MORE (D-Calif.) and Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellHouse Democrat explains decision to back impeachment: 'We've crossed a Rubicon' Sunday shows lineup: Trump impeachment dominates the talk circuit Live coverage: House panel to hear about whistleblower complaint MORE (D-Ala.), both lost their bids for leadership when Democrats huddled for closed-door elections Wednesday and Thursday.

It was an especially bitter pill to swallow for some members, given that the 2018 midterms ushered in the most diverse Congress in history - including a record-breaking number of women.

“It was glaring to us that we didn’t have an African-American female, and yet, black women are the foundation of the party and carried the vote,” Rep. Joyce BeattyJoyce Birdson BeattyThe 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment Trump: Demoted New York Times editor should have been fired New York Times demotes editor over controversial tweets MORE (D-Ohio), who was just elected vice-chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, told The Hill on Thursday.

On Wednesday, Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesLawmakers from both sides of the aisle mourn Cummings House chairman: Pompeo not complying with impeachment inquiry Sunday shows - Second whistleblower grabs spotlight MORE (D-N.Y.), a CBC member and young rising star in the Democratic party, just narrowly edged out Lee in the race for caucus chair. The loss was especially disappointing given that Lee, 72, also narrowly lost a bid for caucus vice-chair in 2016.

Meanwhile, Sewell was defeated by Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinEx-Trump aide on Russia testifies for 10 hours as part of impeachment inquiry Oversight panel to subpoena Trump officials next week over deportation deferrals Democrats plow ahead as Trump seeks to hobble impeachment effort MORE of Maryland in the contest for caucus representative - a spot reserved for a member who’s served five terms or fewer.

Other Democrats who won a seat at the leadership table this week include Rep. Jim ClyburnJames (Jim) Enos ClyburnPelosi calls Cummings 'our North Star' as Democratic leaders mourn his death Democrats gauge support for vote on impeachment inquiry Nancy Pelosi is ready for this fight MORE (S.C.), a senior CBC member who will serve as majority whip; Rep. Ben Ray-Luján (N.M.), a hispanic lawmaker who secured the assistant leadership post; Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosDCCC leader advises Democrats to keep messaging on impeachment 'simple' House Democratic campaign arm raises .4 million in third quarter Pelosi tells Democrats to focus on Constitution, not Trump MORE (Ill.), a female lawmaker who will lead the House Democratic campaign arm; and Rep. Ted LieuTed W. LieuTestimony from GOP diplomat complicates Trump defense Lawmakers, social media users praise photo of Pelosi confronting Trump Democrats eye Pompeo testimony MORE (Calif.), an immigrant from Taiwan who nabbed one of the co-chair slots on the Democratic Policy and Communications Committee.

House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCummings to lie in state at the Capitol House Republicans 'demand the release of the rules' on impeachment Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union —Dem wants more changes to Pelosi drug pricing bill | Ebola outbreak wanes, but funding lags | Johnson & Johnson recalls batch of baby powder after asbestos traces found MORE (D-Calif.), the first female Speaker of the House, was nominated by her caucus to retake the gavel ahead of the vote in January.

The House GOP, by comparison, elected just one female and no minorities to its leadership ranks.

Still, many Democrats are disappointed not a single woman of color will fill a spot on their own leadership ladder.

Rep. Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeeConsequential GOP class of 1994 all but disappears Video of Greta Thunberg crossing paths with Trump at UN goes viral Lewandowski: House testimony shows I'd be 'a fighter' in the Senate MORE (D-Texas) said the absence of women of color in the leadership ranks means Democrats need to redouble their efforts “to ensure that we have the fully balanced and responsive leadership that entails the faces of all of America.”

“Absolutely, I am concerned,” she said. “I’m delighted with the women; I’m delighted with the people of color; I’m delighted with the men; we have regional diversity, and I think that’s excellent. I applaud that. But we’ll also look to make sure that the face of America is reflected.”

However, not very many minority females ran for leadership positions in the first place.

Rep. Linda SanchezLinda Teresa SánchezFirst major 'Medicare for All' hearing sharpens attacks on both sides WHIP LIST: The 228 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry We can accelerate a cure for Alzheimer's MORE (D-Calif.), former chairwoman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, dropped out of the race for caucus chair after her husband was charged with misusing federal funds. And Rep. Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeHillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions House Democrats introduce new legislation to combat foreign election interference Harris wins endorsement of former CBC Chairwoman Marcia Fudge MORE (D-Ohio), a former chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus, opted not to challenge Pelosi.

“It’s a glaring deficiency, and something that we have to work on,” Rep. Hank JohnsonHenry (Hank) C. JohnsonMaloney to serve as acting Oversight chairwoman after Cummings's death The 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment Hillary Clinton backs impeachment inquiry into Trump MORE (D-Ga.), a Black Caucus member, told The Hill. “Sometimes when you get to these leadership elections, and you have a slew of people who are running, and you start picking, and you get to the end and you tally everything… you realize when you look at everyone’s picture that someone, a demographic, has been left out.”

After her loss, Lee told reporters a variety of factors, including ageism and sexism, likely factored into the results, adding that women of color have an even tougher time overcoming those barriers.

“That is something that women, especially women of color and African-American women, have to fight constantly each and every day,” Lee said. “We still have many glass ceilings to break.”

But a number of CBC women are in line to nab committee and subcommittee gavels in the majority, such as Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersHillicon Valley: FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger | Dems wrangle over breaking up Big Tech at debate | Critics pounce as Facebook's Libra stumbles | Zuckerberg to be interviewed by Fox News | Twitter details rules for political figures' tweets On The Money: Tax, loan documents for Trump properties reportedly showed inconsistencies | Tensions flare as Dems hammer Trump consumer chief | Critics pounce as Facebook crypto project stumbles Zuckerberg meets with Waters ahead of congressional testimony MORE (D-Calif.), who is in line to lead the power Financial Services Committee, and Rep. Eddie Bernice JohnsonEddie Bernice JohnsonEPA official delayed recusal on key health study for ex-employer: report Democrats inch closer to issuing subpoenas for Interior, EPA records The Hill's Campaign Report: Impeachment fight to take center stage at Dem debate MORE (D-Texas), who will take over the Science, Space and Technology Committee.

And Pelosi agreed to make Fudge the chairwoman of a defunct subcommittee on elections, which had been a top priority for the Black Caucus.

“Hopefully, with us being in the majority, there will be some positions. Sometimes, things are appointed that become bigger than some of the elected offices. I think you’ll see many of us looking for some chairmanships and other leadership roles,” Beatty said.

“I’m interested in a leadership role within our new majority process,” she added. “I’m African-American, I’m female and I’m talented. So lets see what happens.”

Rep. Nanette Barragan (D-Calif.), a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, cautioned against judging the new leadership team based strictly on identity politics and whether each and every group is represented at the table. Leadership elections, she argued, are more nuanced than that, particularly since so much of a vote hinges on interpersonal relationships between individual members.

“It’s not fair to make a generalization, like, ‘Oh, because you’re a woman of color you’re going to support a woman of color. There’s other factors. In some cases, ideology … We have progressives supporting progressives, personal relationships,” she said.

Barragan said the key to getting more minority women in leadership is simple: bring more of them to Congress.

“The bottom line is we need more women of color in Congress to create more opportunities for them to be in leadership. That’s the bottom line.”

Bustos said that recruiting more women of color to run for office will be a top priority for her when she takes the reins at the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC).

“That is very high on my list of things I want to accomplish over at the DCCC,” she told The Hill.

-Mike Lillis contributed