SPONSORED:

Bed, Bath & Beyond, Kohl's pull MyPillow from shelves after CEO's meeting with Trump

Bed, Bath & Beyond and Kohl’s are among the retailers that MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says have dropped his products following the businessman’s meeting with President TrumpDonald TrumpCaitlyn Jenner on Hannity touts Trump: 'He was a disruptor' Ivanka Trump doubles down on vaccine push with post celebrating second shot Conservative Club for Growth PAC comes out against Stefanik to replace Cheney MORE on Friday. 

Lindell on Monday told NBC’s Minneapolis, Minn., affiliate station KARE that the companies, along with HEB Stores, Wayfair and Canada's Today's Shopping Choice channel, have stopped carrying his products. 

A Bed Bath & Beyond spokesperson confirmed to The Hill that the company has discontinued its MyPillow product line, but added this was part of a larger effort to "discontinue a number of underperforming items and brands."

ADVERTISEMENT

"We are continually improving our product assortment, which includes plans to offer an array of unique and exclusive Owned Brands from Spring 2021," the spokesperson added. "Our decisions are data-driven, customer-inspired and are delivering substantial growth in our key destination categories.”

A representative for Today's Shopping Choice confirmed to NBC News that MyPillow products would no longer be sold on the channel.

The Hill has reached out to other companies for comment. 

Lindell, popularly known as the “MyPillow guy,” told right-wing media channel Right Side Broadcasting Saturday that activists were attempting to "cancel" him by urging stores to drop the bedding company’s products. 

"They've attacked my company. ... They've attacked companies that I've worked with. ... They're trying to cancel me out," Lindell said on the broadcast.

ADVERTISEMENT

This comes as Lindell has also faced condemnation for repeatedly advancing Trump’s unsubstantiated claims of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election that led to President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenCaitlyn Jenner on Hannity touts Trump: 'He was a disruptor' Argentina launches 'Green Mondays' campaign to cut greenhouse gases On The Money: Federal judge vacates CDC's eviction moratorium | Biden says he's open to compromise on corporate tax rate | Treasury unsure of how long it can stave off default without debt limit hike MORE’s win. 

Earlier this month, lawyers for Dominion Voting Systems sent a letter to Lindell threatening him with legal action over his false claims that Dominion was involved in the alleged voter fraud, adding that Lindell led a “smear campaign against Dominion” and had “leveraged your significant social media following to inflict the maximum amount of damage to Dominion’s good name and business operations.” 

Lindell doubled down on his accusations in response to the threat of a lawsuit, telling Axios, "I want Dominion to put up their lawsuit because we have 100% evidence that China and other countries used their machines to steal the election."

Dominion earlier this month filed a $1.3 billion lawsuit against pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell for her claims the company rigged the election by manipulating votes.

Lindell has also come under scrutiny after he was photographed leaving a meeting with Trump at the White House Friday. Zoomed-in shots of the images, taken by Washington Post photographer Jabin Botsford, show the partially visible notes appearing to mention Powell, as well as “martial law if necessary” and the “Insurrection Act,” an 1806 law that allows the president to mobilize the military and National Guard troops to quell civil disorder or actions of insurrection. 

The images quickly went viral on social media, though White House officials told The New York Times on Friday that nothing substantial to note came out of Lindell’s meeting with Trump, which the White House said lasted about five to 10 minutes.