Huawei hires three new lobbying firms

Huawei hires three new lobbying firms
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Embattled Chinese telecom Huawei recently hired three new lobbying firms, according to disclosure reports filed with Congress.

The new hires come as President BidenJoe BidenFive takeaways from the Ohio special primaries FDA aims to give full approval to Pfizer vaccine by Labor Day: report Overnight Defense: Police officer killed in violence outside Pentagon | Biden officials back repeal of Iraq War authorization | NSC pushed to oversee 'Havana Syndrome' response MORE keeps in place policies enacted by former President TrumpDonald TrumpFive takeaways from the Ohio special primaries Missouri Rep. Billy Long enters Senate GOP primary Trump-backed Mike Carey wins GOP primary in Ohio special election MORE that have stifled Huawei’s ability to do business internationally.

According to recent lobbying filings, Huawei hired former Rep. Lee TerryLee Raymond TerryHillicon Valley: Warren asks SEC to take closer look at cryptocurrency exchanges | Maryland town knocked offline as part of massive ransomware attack | Huawei hires three new lobbying firms Huawei hires three new lobbying firms Ashford, Eastman neck and neck in Nebraska Dem primary MORE (R-Neb.); Glenn LeMunyon, a former aide to former House Majority Whip Tom DeLay (R-Texas); and Stephen Binhak, a former prosecutor in the Whitewater investigation into former President Clinton. All three run their own firms.

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“Huawei has engaged with these firms to generate a better understanding between Huawei and the U.S. government,” a source familiar with the matter told The Hill.

Terry and LeMunyon will lobby on issues related to telecommunications and infrastructure, according to the lobbying filings. Binhak will lobby on issues related to trade, economic sanctions and the annual defense spending bill, among other measures.

Huawei’s sales outside of China have plummeted following a series of restrictions imposed by the Trump administration and further tightened by the Biden administration. The U.S. has accused Huawei of using its technology to spy on U.S. entities on behalf of Beijing, an allegation the company denies.

In 2019, the Trump administration barred Huawei from doing business with American companies, including key partners such as Google, Qualcomm and Intel. The U.S. has urged its European allies to block Huawei from building their 5G networks.

Last month, Biden signed an executive order prohibiting U.S. investments in Huawei and other Chinese companies that allegedly helped the Chinese government repress Uyghur Muslims and pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong.

The Senate’s China competitiveness bill, passed last month, would prevent the Commerce Department from lifting the U.S. restrictions on Huawei without certifying that the company no longer poses a threat to national security. The House is not taking up the Senate-passed measure but will instead focus on several smaller bills.

Huawei aims to sway Biden officials as they review Trump’s China-related policies. The telecom is also pushing for the release of its executive Meng Wanzhou, who is being held in Canada on charges of circumventing U.S. sanctions.