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Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds

Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds
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Among Democrats in Congress, Rep. Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerRestaurants brace for long COVID-19 winter Ahead of a coronavirus vaccine, Mexico's drug pricing to have far-reaching impacts on Americans Trump threatens to double down on Portland in other major cities MORE (Ore.) received the most money from marijuana industry groups in the 2018 election cycle, a new study finds.

Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM), a group which opposes legalization, reviewed FEC filings to track donations from the country's top marijuana groups to incumbents who ran in November.

Topping the list is Blumenauer with $33,176. He received money from multiple contributors, including two contributions of $5,000 from the National Cannabis Industry Association PAC.

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Blumenauer leading the list is no surprise based on his pro-weed record in Congress. He introduced a bill to remove marijuana from the list of controlled substances at the beginning of the new Congress this year and numbered it H.R. 420, a joking reference to April 20, a popular day for pot enthusiasts. Blumenauer is also co-chairman of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus.

Rep. Dina TitusAlice (Dina) Costandina TitusCoordinated federal leadership is needed for recovery of US travel and tourism Shakespeare Theatre Company goes virtual for 'Will on the Hill...or Won't They?' Safe, responsible casino gaming supports state economies at crucial time MORE (D-Nev.) was second on the list, taking in $19,350, most of which came in contributions of less than $1,000.

Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeOcasio-Cortez, progressives call on Senate not to confirm lobbyists or executives to future administration posts Democrats accuse tech companies of deceitful tactics in campaign against Calif. ballot measure Congress fiddles while the US burns, floods, and ails MORE (D-Calif.), came in third with $18,604 in contributions, while Rep. Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterGreen neighborhoods for better jobs, a cleaner environment, and a sustainable future Congress needs to finalize space weather bill as solar storms pose heightened threat OVERNIGHT ENERGY: 20 states sue over Trump rule limiting states from blocking pipeline projects | House Democrats add 'forever chemicals' provisions to defense bill after spiking big amendment | Lawmakers seek extension for tribes to spend stimulus money MORE (D-Colo.) received $16,858 from marijuana industry groups and Rep. Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockHouse votes to condemn alleged hysterectomies on migrant women House to vote on removing cannabis from list of controlled substances House votes to remove Confederate statues from Capitol MORE (Calif.) received $12,350.

The states the lawmakers hail from — Oregon, Nevada, California and Colorado — all have laws allowing legal recreational cannabis use.

Two former House GOP lawmakers actually took in more than Blumenauer, but both are out of Congress after losing their reelection bids.

Former Rep. Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherDemocrat Harley Rouda advances in California House primary Lawyers to seek asylum for Assange in France: report Rohrabacher tells Yahoo he discussed pardon with Assange for proof Russia didn't hack DNC email MORE (R-Calif.) took in over $90,000 and former Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloThe Memo: Trump furor stokes fears of unrest GOP wants more vision, policy from Trump at convention Mucarsel-Powell, Giménez to battle for Florida swing district MORE (R-Fla.) received over $80,000, according to Smart Approaches to Marijuana’s data. Rohrabacher was a prominent pro-marijuana industry advocate while in the House.

Looking at senators who won reelection in 2018, Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSenators battle over Supreme Court nominee in rare Saturday session Sunday shows preview: Trump, Biden gear up for final sprint to Election Day Plaintiff and defendant from Obergefell v. Hodges unite to oppose Barrett's confirmation MORE (D-Ohio) received the most from marijuana groups. He took in $5,733, while Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Pelosi, Mnuchin push stimulus talks forward, McConnell applies brakes MORE (D-Calif.) received $5,400 and Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellDemocrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein Hillicon Valley: Senate panel votes to subpoena Big Tech executives | Amazon says over 19,000 workers tested positive for COVID-19 | Democrats demand DHS release report warning of election interference Senate panel votes to subpoena Big Tech executives MORE (D-Wash.) received $2,700.

Two former House members who were elected to the upper chamber, Democratic Sens. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenHillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close Lawmakers introduce legislation to boost cybersecurity of local governments, small businesses Senators introduce bipartisan bill to help women, minorities get STEM jobs MORE (Nev.) and Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.), received $10,150 and $2,500, respectively. Former Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (R-Nev.), who lost his reelection bid to Rosen, took in $5,000 from marijuana groups, according to SAM.

The lawmakers' offices did not respond to a request for comment or declined to comment.

Smart Approaches to Marijuana is opposed to the relaxing of marijuana laws and represents a broad, nonpartisan coalition of groups and organizations who are pushing back against legalization. The group on Tuesday shared their data in a map that breaks down industry donations to officials.