Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds

Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds
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Among Democrats in Congress, Rep. Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerPortland hotel chain founded by Trump ambassador says boycott is attack on employees VA under pressure to ease medical marijuana rules Coalition of farmers and ranchers endorses Green New Deal MORE (Ore.) received the most money from marijuana industry groups in the 2018 election cycle, a new study finds.

Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM), a group which opposes legalization, reviewed FEC filings to track donations from the country's top marijuana groups to incumbents who ran in November.

Topping the list is Blumenauer with $33,176. He received money from multiple contributors, including two contributions of $5,000 from the National Cannabis Industry Association PAC.

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Blumenauer leading the list is no surprise based on his pro-weed record in Congress. He introduced a bill to remove marijuana from the list of controlled substances at the beginning of the new Congress this year and numbered it H.R. 420, a joking reference to April 20, a popular day for pot enthusiasts. Blumenauer is also co-chairman of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus.

Rep. Dina TitusAlice (Dina) Costandina TitusThe PREPARED Act will protect vulnerable animals when disaster strikes Marijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis House Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment MORE (D-Nev.) was second on the list, taking in $19,350, most of which came in contributions of less than $1,000.

Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeDeLauro enters race to succeed Lowey as Appropriations chief The 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment Lawmakers mourn death of 'Julia' star Diahann Carroll MORE (D-Calif.), came in third with $18,604 in contributions, while Rep. Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterFinancial sector's work on SAFE Banking Act shows together, everyone achieves more House passes bill to protect cannabis industry access to banks, credit unions Showing consumers health care pricing could lower costs MORE (D-Colo.) received $16,858 from marijuana industry groups and Rep. Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockOvernight Energy: Lawmakers show irritation over withheld Interior documents | Republican offers bipartisan carbon tax bill | Scientists booted from EPA panel form new group Lawmakers show bipartisan irritation with Interior over withheld documents Marijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis MORE (Calif.) received $12,350.

The states the lawmakers hail from — Oregon, Nevada, California and Colorado — all have laws allowing legal recreational cannabis use.

Two former House GOP lawmakers actually took in more than Blumenauer, but both are out of Congress after losing their reelection bids.

Former Rep. Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump, Biden go toe-to-toe in Iowa Ex-GOP lawmakers are face of marijuana blitz Former GOP Rep. Rohrabacher joins board of cannabis company MORE (R-Calif.) took in over $90,000 and former Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloThe Memo: Bad polls for Trump shake GOP Anxious GOP treads carefully with Trump defense The Memo: Trump's rage may backfire on impeachment MORE (R-Fla.) received over $80,000, according to Smart Approaches to Marijuana’s data. Rohrabacher was a prominent pro-marijuana industry advocate while in the House.

Looking at senators who won reelection in 2018, Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBlood cancer patients deserve equal access to the cure Trump admin abruptly delays funding for human trafficking victims: report Overnight Energy: Lawmakers show irritation over withheld Interior documents | Republican offers bipartisan carbon tax bill | Scientists booted from EPA panel form new group MORE (D-Ohio) received the most from marijuana groups. He took in $5,733, while Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSchiff should consider using RICO framework to organize impeachment We need answers to questions mainstream media won't ask about Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Trump grapples with Syria fallout MORE (D-Calif.) received $5,400 and Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellDemocrats urge Rick Perry not to roll back lightbulb efficiency rules Hillicon Valley: Trump official declines to testify on trade protections for tech | Senators call for better info-sharing on supply chain threats | Apple pulls app after Chinese pressure On The Money: Trump to meet China's vice premier during trade talks | Appeals court says Deutsche Bank doesn't have Trump's tax returns | House Appropriations Chair Nita Lowey to retire MORE (D-Wash.) received $2,700.

Two former House members who were elected to the upper chamber, Democratic Sens. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenHillicon Valley: Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract | FTC weighs updating kids' internet privacy rules | Schumer calls for FaceApp probe | Report says states need more money to secure elections Senators introduce legislation to boost cyber defense training in high school Key endorsements: A who's who in early states MORE (Nev.) and Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.), received $10,150 and $2,500, respectively. Former Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerThis week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary MORE (R-Nev.), who lost his reelection bid to Rosen, took in $5,000 from marijuana groups, according to SAM.

The lawmakers' offices did not respond to a request for comment or declined to comment.

Smart Approaches to Marijuana is opposed to the relaxing of marijuana laws and represents a broad, nonpartisan coalition of groups and organizations who are pushing back against legalization. The group on Tuesday shared their data in a map that breaks down industry donations to officials.