Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds

Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds
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Among Democrats in Congress, Rep. Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerLobbying world Hillicon Valley: Progressives oppose funding bill over surveillance authority | Senators call for 5G security coordinator | Facebook gets questions over location tracking | Louisiana hit by ransomware attack Progressives oppose spending stopgap measure over surveillance authority extension MORE (Ore.) received the most money from marijuana industry groups in the 2018 election cycle, a new study finds.

Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM), a group which opposes legalization, reviewed FEC filings to track donations from the country's top marijuana groups to incumbents who ran in November.

Topping the list is Blumenauer with $33,176. He received money from multiple contributors, including two contributions of $5,000 from the National Cannabis Industry Association PAC.

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Blumenauer leading the list is no surprise based on his pro-weed record in Congress. He introduced a bill to remove marijuana from the list of controlled substances at the beginning of the new Congress this year and numbered it H.R. 420, a joking reference to April 20, a popular day for pot enthusiasts. Blumenauer is also co-chairman of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus.

Rep. Dina TitusAlice (Dina) Costandina TitusThe US needs to lead again on disability rights Krystal Ball: New Biden ad is everything that's wrong with Democrats Top Latina adviser quits Biden campaign MORE (D-Nev.) was second on the list, taking in $19,350, most of which came in contributions of less than $1,000.

Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeBooker unveils legislation for federal bill to ban discrimination against natural hair Adam Schiff's star rises with impeachment hearings Lawmakers visit African migrants at US-Mexico border MORE (D-Calif.), came in third with $18,604 in contributions, while Rep. Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterImpeachment surprise: Bills Congress could actually pass in 2020 Financial sector's work on SAFE Banking Act shows together, everyone achieves more House passes bill to protect cannabis industry access to banks, credit unions MORE (D-Colo.) received $16,858 from marijuana industry groups and Rep. Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockControversy on phone records intensifies amid impeachment Ex-ambassador to Russia blasts lawmaker for Trump-Lincoln comparison Judiciary Republican asks impeachment witnesses if they voted for Trump MORE (Calif.) received $12,350.

The states the lawmakers hail from — Oregon, Nevada, California and Colorado — all have laws allowing legal recreational cannabis use.

Two former House GOP lawmakers actually took in more than Blumenauer, but both are out of Congress after losing their reelection bids.

Former Rep. Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherGeorge Papadopoulos launches campaign to run for Katie Hill's congressional seat The Hill's Morning Report - Trump, Biden go toe-to-toe in Iowa Ex-GOP lawmakers are face of marijuana blitz MORE (R-Calif.) took in over $90,000 and former Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloRepublicans can't exploit the left's climate extremism without a better idea Progressive Latino group launches first incumbent protection campaign The Memo: Bad polls for Trump shake GOP MORE (R-Fla.) received over $80,000, according to Smart Approaches to Marijuana’s data. Rohrabacher was a prominent pro-marijuana industry advocate while in the House.

Looking at senators who won reelection in 2018, Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownTrump trade deal likely to sow division in Democratic presidential field On The Money: Pelosi, Trump tout deal on new NAFTA | McConnell says no trade vote until impeachment trial wraps up | Lawmakers push spending deadline to Thursday Pelosi announces support for new Trump NAFTA deal MORE (D-Ohio) received the most from marijuana groups. He took in $5,733, while Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinHillicon Valley: Apple, Facebook defend encryption during Senate grilling | Tech legal shield makes it into trade deal | Impeachment controversy over phone records heats up | TikTok chief cancels Capitol Hill meetings Apple, Facebook defend encryption during Senate grilling Houston police chief excoriates McConnell, Cornyn and Cruz on gun violence MORE (D-Calif.) received $5,400 and Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellLet's enact a privacy law that advances economic justice There's a lot to like about the Senate privacy bill, if it's not watered down Hillicon Valley: House passes anti-robocall bill | Senators inch forward on privacy legislation | Trump escalates fight over tech tax | Illinois families sue TikTok | Senators get classified briefing on ransomware MORE (D-Wash.) received $2,700.

Two former House members who were elected to the upper chamber, Democratic Sens. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenHillicon Valley: Facebook to remove mentions of potential whistleblower's name | House Dems demand FCC action over leak of location data | Dem presses regulators to secure health care data Senators introduce bill to create 'parity' among broadband programs Senators introduce cybersecurity workforce expansion bill MORE (Nev.) and Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.), received $10,150 and $2,500, respectively. Former Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerThis week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary MORE (R-Nev.), who lost his reelection bid to Rosen, took in $5,000 from marijuana groups, according to SAM.

The lawmakers' offices did not respond to a request for comment or declined to comment.

Smart Approaches to Marijuana is opposed to the relaxing of marijuana laws and represents a broad, nonpartisan coalition of groups and organizations who are pushing back against legalization. The group on Tuesday shared their data in a map that breaks down industry donations to officials.