Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds

Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds
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Among Democrats in Congress, Rep. Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerAirports already have plenty of infrastructure funding Climate protesters glue themselves to Capitol doors, confront lawmakers Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment MORE (Ore.) received the most money from marijuana industry groups in the 2018 election cycle, a new study finds.

Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM), a group which opposes legalization, reviewed FEC filings to track donations from the country's top marijuana groups to incumbents who ran in November.

Topping the list is Blumenauer with $33,176. He received money from multiple contributors, including two contributions of $5,000 from the National Cannabis Industry Association PAC.

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Blumenauer leading the list is no surprise based on his pro-weed record in Congress. He introduced a bill to remove marijuana from the list of controlled substances at the beginning of the new Congress this year and numbered it H.R. 420, a joking reference to April 20, a popular day for pot enthusiasts. Blumenauer is also co-chairman of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus.

Rep. Dina TitusAlice (Dina) Costandina TitusHouse Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Key endorsements: A who's who in early states MORE (D-Nev.) was second on the list, taking in $19,350, most of which came in contributions of less than $1,000.

Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeLawmakers urge DNC to name Asian American debate moderator Overnight Health Care: Planned Parenthood to leave federal family planning program absent court action | Democrats demand Trump withdraw rule on transgender health | Cummings, Sanders investigate three drug companies for 'obstructing' probe Democrats demand Trump officials withdraw rule on transgender health MORE (D-Calif.), came in third with $18,604 in contributions, while Rep. Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterAppetite for Democratic term limits fizzling out Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp On The Money: Liberal Dems warn moderates against changes to minimum wage bill | House grapples with Facebook's Libra | Congress, White House inch closer to budget deal | Blue states sue over tax law regulations MORE (D-Colo.) received $16,858 from marijuana industry groups and Rep. Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockLive coverage: Mueller testifies before Congress 58 GOP lawmakers vote against disaster aid bill Conservation happens one animal at a time MORE (Calif.) received $12,350.

The states the lawmakers hail from — Oregon, Nevada, California and Colorado — all have laws allowing legal recreational cannabis use.

Two former House GOP lawmakers actually took in more than Blumenauer, but both are out of Congress after losing their reelection bids.

Former Rep. Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump, Biden go toe-to-toe in Iowa Ex-GOP lawmakers are face of marijuana blitz Former GOP Rep. Rohrabacher joins board of cannabis company MORE (R-Calif.) took in over $90,000 and former Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloOvernight Energy: Warren edges past Sanders in poll of climate-focused voters | Carbon tax shows new signs of life | Greens fuming at Trump plans for development at Bears Ears monument Carbon tax shows new signs of life in Congress Democratic lawmaker pushes back on Castro's call to repeal law making illegal border crossings a crime MORE (R-Fla.) received over $80,000, according to Smart Approaches to Marijuana’s data. Rohrabacher was a prominent pro-marijuana industry advocate while in the House.

Looking at senators who won reelection in 2018, Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBank watchdogs approve rule to loosen ban on risky Wall Street trades Dayton mayor assigned extra security following verbal spat with Trump The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape MORE (D-Ohio) received the most from marijuana groups. He took in $5,733, while Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTrump administration urges Congress to reauthorize NSA surveillance program The Hill's Morning Report - More talk on guns; many questions on Epstein's death Juan Williams: We need a backlash against Big Tech MORE (D-Calif.) received $5,400 and Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellWill Congress act to stop robocalls? Native American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment Hillicon Valley: Trump reportedly weighing executive action on alleged tech bias | WH to convene summit on online extremism | Federal agencies banned from buying Huawei equipment | Lawmakers jump start privacy talks MORE (D-Wash.) received $2,700.

Two former House members who were elected to the upper chamber, Democratic Sens. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenHillicon Valley: Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract | FTC weighs updating kids' internet privacy rules | Schumer calls for FaceApp probe | Report says states need more money to secure elections Senators introduce legislation to boost cyber defense training in high school Key endorsements: A who's who in early states MORE (Nev.) and Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.), received $10,150 and $2,500, respectively. Former Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerThis week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary MORE (R-Nev.), who lost his reelection bid to Rosen, took in $5,000 from marijuana groups, according to SAM.

The lawmakers' offices did not respond to a request for comment or declined to comment.

Smart Approaches to Marijuana is opposed to the relaxing of marijuana laws and represents a broad, nonpartisan coalition of groups and organizations who are pushing back against legalization. The group on Tuesday shared their data in a map that breaks down industry donations to officials.