Seven-figure ad campaign urges GOP to support infrastructure bill

Seven-figure ad campaign urges GOP to support infrastructure bill
© Greg Nash

Citizens for Responsible Energy Solutions (CRES) on Tuesday launched a $1.5 million TV, radio and digital ad campaign to build GOP support for the bipartisan infrastructure bill.

The advocacy group, which urges Republicans to support clean energy policies, is targeting nine GOP senators who have expressed interest in voting for the bill. 

“Fixing America’s aging and failing core infrastructure holds broad support across the country and across political parties,” said Heather Reams, the group’s executive director. “CRES strongly supports the bipartisan infrastructure package that works for all Americans by making our transportation, energy, and water sectors more reliable, resilient, and ready for the future.”

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The ads target Sens. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoRepublicans struggle to save funding for Trump's border wall White House looks to rein in gas prices ahead of busy travel season Bipartisan success in the Senate signals room for more compromise MORE (R-W.Va.), Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstBiden picks former Senate candidate Theresa Greenfield to Iowa's USDA post Biden has just 33 percent approval rating in Iowa poll Overnight Defense & National Security — A new plan to treat Marines 'like human beings' MORE (R-Iowa), Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGraham emerges as go-to ally for Biden's judicial picks Iowa Democrat drops bid to challenge Grassley after death of nephew Bipartisan senators press FBI, inspector general for changes following Nassar case MORE (R-Iowa), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranDemocrats face squeeze on Biden's spending bill Senators seek to permanently expand telehealth eligibility Senate GOP signals they'll help bail out Biden's Fed chair MORE (R-Kan.), Mike RoundsMike RoundsOvernight Defense & National Security — A new plan to treat Marines 'like human beings' Republicans press Milley over perceived progressive military agenda Jean Rounds, wife of South Dakota Sen. Mike Rounds, dies from cancer MORE (R-S.D.), John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneParnell exit threatens to hurt Trump's political clout Schumer-McConnell dial down the debt ceiling drama McConnell, Schumer hunt for debt ceiling off-ramp MORE (R-S.D.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrTexas Democrat Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson announces retirement at end of term On The Money — IRS chief calls for reinforcements Burr brother-in-law ordered to testify in insider trading probe MORE (R-N.C.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisOvernight Defense & National Security — A new plan to treat Marines 'like human beings' Republicans press Milley over perceived progressive military agenda Gun control group alleges campaign finance violations in lawsuit against NRA MORE (R-N.C.) and Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungOvernight Defense & National Security — Presented by Boeing — Senators to take up defense bill Wednesday Schumer: Time is 'now' to repeal Iraq War resolution It's time to give Medicare beneficiaries the opportunity and choice of recovery in the home MORE (R-Ind.).

Some of those GOP senators, including Thune, Moran and Young, have expressed skepticism about the funding mechanisms in the 2,700-page infrastructure bill, saying their vote could depend on the Congressional Budget Office’s assessment of the plan.

The Senate is currently debating amendments to the bill, which contains $550 billion in new spending to overhaul roads, bridges, transit, rail, broadband internet and the electric grid, among other measures.

The plan includes several energy measures backed by clean energy groups. The bill provides funding for zero-emission vehicles, energy efficient buildings and alternative energy sources such as solar, nuclear, hydrogen and hydropower.

The Senate needs to reach 60 votes to pass the bill. While 17 Republicans voted to start debate on the legislation, there is no guarantee that enough Republicans will support its final passage.

The proposal is backed by influential business groups and unions. The groups are battling former President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer defense secretary Esper sues Pentagon in memoir dispute Biden celebrates start of Hanukkah Fauci says lies, threats are 'noise' MORE, who has accused Senate Republicans of “caving” to Democrats on the deal.