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• ONLINE GAMING. The Coalition to Stop Internet Gambling, a group bankrolled by casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, has hired another firm to lobby on its behalf, The Keelen Group. It is the second firm hired by the coalition, after Squire Patton Boggs in May. In 2015, the coalition reported paying Squire lobbyists $290,000, with the team including former Sen. Trent Lott (R-Miss.) and Dave Schnittger, former deputy chief of staff to former Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerFormer Speaker Boehner's official portrait unveiled Key Republicans say Biden can break Washington gridlock From learning on his feet to policy director MORE (R-Ohio). The coalition — which includes various religious, law enforcement and nonprofit groups — wants Congress to restore the Wire Act, which would effectively outlaw online gambling.

Amaya Services Ltd., a Canadian online gaming company, hired CSA Strategies to work on issues related to the licensing of Internet gaming and poker. Now lobbying on its behalf is Alejandro Urrea, former counsel to the House Financial Services Committee.

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• EDUCATION. Capitol Counsel is advocating for First Five Years Fund, an advocacy group that works to increase investment in childcare. Disclosure forms say that lobbyists are working on a number of initiatives, including early discussions about tax reform. Specifically, the firm is working toward measures that could result in an “increased investment in quality early childhood education programs for children ages 0-5 in disadvantaged populations,” according to forms. As the budget is being discussed, they’re also looking for “increased appropriations for pre-school development block grants, childhood development block grants, and Headstart funding.” 

• CIVIL LIBERTIES. Demand Progress, a left-leaning nonprofit, has hired consulting firm Pale Blue to lobby policymakers on “civil liberties and surveillance” issues. One of the group’s largest issues right now is the Obama administration’s initiative to open up competition in cable set-top boxes. The group is urging citizens to lobby the Federal Communications Commission in favor of the rule, which would open the set-top box market to competition and give consumers choices.