Bottom Line

Bottom Line
© Greg Nash

• PETS. The lobbying firm Federal Advocates Inc. signed a slew of new clients recently, including two having to do with federal issues involving animals: The Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC) and Petland. PIJAC hired the firm to work with policymakers on issues “related to pet ownership, including protecting the right to own a pet.” On the group’s website, it lists this as one of its top issues — targeting “pet sale bans and limits on the types of pets people may own” — because they “can cripple legitimate businesses and foster an underground, unregulated market for pets.” The pet store franchisor Petland, meanwhile, hired the firm to work on the farm bill, according to forms. One amendment to the farm bill, from Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingWarren calls out GOP congressman for 'white supremacist propaganda,' encourages donations to his opponent GOP lawmaker accuses black students of supporting 'George Wallace's segregation' The stakes are sky-high for the pro-life cause in the upcoming midterms MORE (R-Iowa), would curtail a state’s ability to set animal welfare standards. Critics worry the measure would undo anti-puppy mill laws, among others, already on the books. Petland has faced accusations in the last decade that it knowingly sells unhealthy dogs or dogs sourced from puppy mills, though it has long denied the claims. A class-action racketeering lawsuit against Petland with these accusations was dismissed earlier this year.

• GUNS. Outdoor retailer Dick’s Sporting Goods hired the lobbying and public relations firm Glover Park Group to advocate on gun control issues, according to disclosure forms that offer no more specificity. Following the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Fla., in February, the retailer pulled all assault-style weapons and high-capacity magazines from its shelves and later said it would be destroying them. Along with Walmart, Dick’s Sporting Goods has also said it will only sell long guns to consumers 21 years and older, rather than the legal age of 18.

• DRUGS. Veterans Cannabis Project also hired Federal Advocates in recent weeks. It is having the firm work with both Capitol Hill and the executive branch to encourage the use of “medical marijuana to treat veterans’ combat and non-combat related healthcare issues.” Nick Etten, a former Navy SEAL, heads up the project. He has been making the case for years to not only legalize the drug, but to encourage its use as part of veteran health-care services.