SPONSORED:

Vulnerable Senate Dem open to legislation ending birthright citizenship

Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyBiden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big Harris walks fine line on Barrett as election nears The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by JobsOhio - Showdown: Trump-Biden debate likely to be nasty MORE, the vulnerable Democratic candidate running for reelection in Indiana, said he was open to looking at legislation that would end birthright citizenship during a Tuesday debate.

"I’m the only person on this stage who voted three times for a border wall. I voted against sanctuary cities. I’ve stood for secure borders with John McCainJohn Sidney McCainObama book excerpt: 'Hard to deny my overconfidence' during early health care discussions Mark Kelly releases Spanish ad featuring Rep. Gallego More than 300 military family members endorse Biden MORE when in 2013, we passed legislation that would have provided an additional 20,000 border agents to the border," he said when asked about birthright citizenship. 

"I heard you say that [Sen.] Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP Senate confirms Trump Supreme Court pick to succeed Ginsburg Murkowski predicts Barrett won't overturn Roe v. Wade Biden seeks to close any path for Trump win in race's final days MORE [R-S.C.] is going to put legislation forward" to rescind the law, Donnelly continued. "We have to take a look at that legislation."

ADVERTISEMENT
"I’d want to see that legislation, make sure it was constitutional and review it first," he added.

Donnelly's Republican opponent Mike Braun also declined to commit his support to one side of the issue, but said that "if Lindsey Graham’s introducing it, it will be something I take a look at."

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump admin to announce coronavirus vaccine will be covered under Medicare, Medicaid: report Election officials say they're getting suspicious emails that may be part of malicious attack on voting: report McConnell tees up Trump judicial pick following Supreme Court vote MORE made his intentions to use an executive order to end birthright citizenship known in an interview aired Tuesday. Legal experts quickly almost unanimously said that such a move would be unconstitutional and challenged in court.

Following the debate, Donnelly commented on the issue to The Hill.

"At tonight’s debate, there was a question about birthright citizenship," Donnelly said in a statement. "The 14th Amendment is clear. What’s also clear is that our immigration system is broken. As I have done in the past, I will work with both parties to find a solution that secures our borders and fixes our broken immigration laws."

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyBarrett confirmation stokes Democrats' fears over ObamaCare On The Money: Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi bullish, Trump tempers optimism | Analysis: Nearly 1M have run out of jobless benefits Grassley: Voters should be skeptical of Biden's pledge to not raise middle class taxes MORE (R-Iowa) said Tuesday that changing birthright citizenship would take a constitutional amendment.

Recent polling of the Indiana Senate race has Braun with a slim lead within the margin of error ahead of the Nov. 6 election.

Updated Wednesday at 8:18 a.m.