Vulnerable Senate Dem open to legislation ending birthright citizenship

Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyK Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers Obama honors 'American statesman' Richard Lugar Former GOP senator Richard Lugar dies at 87 MORE, the vulnerable Democratic candidate running for reelection in Indiana, said he was open to looking at legislation that would end birthright citizenship during a Tuesday debate.

"I’m the only person on this stage who voted three times for a border wall. I voted against sanctuary cities. I’ve stood for secure borders with John McCainJohn Sidney McCainClimate change is a GOP issue, too It's Joe Biden's 2020 presidential nomination to lose Meghan McCain on Pelosi-Trump feud: 'Put this crap aside' and 'work together for America' MORE when in 2013, we passed legislation that would have provided an additional 20,000 border agents to the border," he said when asked about birthright citizenship. 

"I heard you say that [Sen.] Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump declassification move unnerves Democrats Climate change is a GOP issue, too New Yorker cover titled 'The Shining' shows Graham, McConnell, Barr polishing Trump's shoes MORE [R-S.C.] is going to put legislation forward" to rescind the law, Donnelly continued. "We have to take a look at that legislation."

ADVERTISEMENT
"I’d want to see that legislation, make sure it was constitutional and review it first," he added.

Donnelly's Republican opponent Mike Braun also declined to commit his support to one side of the issue, but said that "if Lindsey Graham’s introducing it, it will be something I take a look at."

President TrumpDonald John TrumpPapadopoulos on AG's new powers: 'Trump is now on the offense' Pelosi uses Trump to her advantage Mike Pence delivers West Point commencement address MORE made his intentions to use an executive order to end birthright citizenship known in an interview aired Tuesday. Legal experts quickly almost unanimously said that such a move would be unconstitutional and challenged in court.

Following the debate, Donnelly commented on the issue to The Hill.

"At tonight’s debate, there was a question about birthright citizenship," Donnelly said in a statement. "The 14th Amendment is clear. What’s also clear is that our immigration system is broken. As I have done in the past, I will work with both parties to find a solution that secures our borders and fixes our broken immigration laws."

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyTrump Citizenship and Immigration Services head out at agency Trump-Pelosi fight threatens drug pricing talks Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Senators unveil sweeping bipartisan health care package | House lawmakers float Medicare pricing reforms | Dems offer bill to guarantee abortion access MORE (R-Iowa) said Tuesday that changing birthright citizenship would take a constitutional amendment.

Recent polling of the Indiana Senate race has Braun with a slim lead within the margin of error ahead of the Nov. 6 election.

Updated Wednesday at 8:18 a.m.