FEATURED:

No-excuse lawmakers: The members who never miss a vote

ITK loves to rib members (see Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. item below), but we also give them props — when warranted. 

So today, ITK is saluting the legislators who have had perfect voting attendance in 2011 and 2012. Of course, this list doesn’t mean these members are the best in Congress, but heck, at least they show up day after day. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Members of the Senate 

Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinGOP leaders hesitant to challenge Trump on Saudi Arabia Dem senator: Trump accepts Saudi denials because he is 'enamored' with dictators Saudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP MORE (D-Md.)

Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsConservatives bankrolled and dominated Kavanaugh confirmation media campaign The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns Susan Collins and the mob mentality MORE (R-Maine)

Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenGOP lawmaker once belittled sexual harassment: 'How traumatizing was it?' Meet the man poised to battle Dems from the White House Minnesota GOP Senate candidate compared Michelle Obama to a chimp in Facebook post MORE (D-Minn.)

Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGOP plays hardball in race to confirm Trump's court picks Trump officials ratchet up drug pricing fight Dems angered by GOP plan to hold judicial hearings in October MORE (R-Iowa)

Mike JohannsMichael (Mike) Owen JohannsMeet the Democratic sleeper candidate gunning for Senate in Nebraska Farmers, tax incentives can ease the pain of a smaller farm bill Lobbying World MORE (R-Neb.)

Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senator seeking information on FBI dealings with Bruce Ohr, former DOJ lawyer Election Countdown: O'Rourke brings in massive M haul | Deal on judges lets senators return to the trail | Hurricane puts Florida candidates in the spotlight | Adelson spending big to save GOP in midterms Senate Homeland chair vents Mueller probe is preventing panel from receiving oversight answers MORE (R-Wis.)

Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinCongress must use bipartisan oversight as the gold standard National security leaders: Trump's Iran strategy could spark war Overnight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms MORE (D-Mich.)

Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocrats slide in battle for Senate McConnell and wife confronted by customers at restaurant Pelosi, Schumer: Trump 'desperate' to put focus on immigration, not health care MORE (R-Ky.)

Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidFive takeaways from testy Heller-Rosen debate in Nevada Major overhauls needed to ensure a violent revolution remains fictional Senate heads home to campaign after deal on Trump nominees MORE (D-Nev.)

Members of the House 

• Sandy Adams (R-Fla.)

• Jason Altmire (D-Pa.)

Justin AmashJustin AmashWatchdog files Hatch Act complaint against Sanders for picture with Kanye in MAGA hat Cook Political Report shifts 7 more races towards Dems Rand Paul ramps up his alliance with Trump MORE (R-Mich.)

• Steve Chabot (R-Ohio)

• Mike Conaway (R-Texas)

Chuck FleischmannCharles (Chuck) Joseph FleischmannDems best GOP as Scalise returns for annual charity baseball game Sadly, fiscal restraint is no longer a core principle of the GOP GOP could punt funding fight to January MORE (R-Tenn.)

• John Kline (R-Minn.)

• Sandy Levin (D-Mich.)

• Frank LoBiondo (R-N.J.)

• Fred Upton (R-Mich.)

Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackBudget chairs press appropriators on veterans spending Senate chairman urges move to two-year budgetary process On The Money: Senate passes first 2019 spending bill | Trump hits Harley-Davidson in tariffs fight | Mnuchin rips report of investment restrictions | Justices side with American Express in antitrust case MORE (R-Ark.)

Honorable mentions: Rep. Kathy Hochul (D-N.Y.), who has made every floor vote since winning her special election in May of 2011; Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanOn The Money: Mnuchin to attend anti-terror meeting in Saudi Arabia | Treasury releases guidance on 'opportunity zone' program | Maxine Waters gets company in new GOP line of attack Election Countdown: O'Rourke brings in massive M haul | Deal on judges lets senators return to the trail | Hurricane puts Florida candidates in the spotlight | Adelson spending big to save GOP in midterms How Kavanaugh got the votes  MORE (R-Ohio) made every vote in 2011, though his perfect record was blemished last week. 

 Cardin told ITK there have been some close calls where leaders have accommodated his requests to keep a vote open. 

Asked whether he will be perfect the rest of the year, Cardin responded, “You never know,” adding that needs in his state and/or family have to be considered. 

Altmire’s office said the Pennsylvania Democrat has not missed a vote since being sworn in to office in 2007, a total of 4,551 votes. 

Altmire and Amash have a bit of a rivalry on the issue, according to Amash spokesman Will Adams. 

“Jason Altmire recently let the clock run down without voting to see how Justin would react. Justin actually got nervous for him and started to search around for him in a panic. Rep. Altmire showed up to vote right before the board closed with a grin on his face. There’s a friendly rivalry, but obviously Rep. Altmire has the longer streak right now,” Adams said. 

Upton takes his voting attendance very seriously. He has had various streaks during his 13 terms on Capitol Hill and winces at the memories of the few he has missed. His initial streak was broken as he was stuck on a runway due to dense fog. 

LoBiondo, meanwhile, has only missed 26 votes since 1995, according to the lawmaker’s spokesman. 

But none of them compares to Grassley, who last missed a roll call vote in July 1993, when he accompanied then-President Clinton to Iowa to inspect flood damage. Before that, he missed a vote in 1989 because of a death in his family.

In a statement, Grassley told ITK, “People are cynical about government and wonder if you’re really on the job. When the Senate’s in session, I’m in Washington voting, and when the Senate is out of session, I’m in Iowa holding meetings with constituents.”