Story at a glance

  • Vogue released two different cover images for its February edition featuring Vice President Harris.
  • Some preferred the digital cover, saying the print cover was too casual and even disrespectful.
  • Now, the magazine is selling a limited number of print editions featuring the alternate cover image.

On the campaign trail, politicians are meant to be approachable, even casual, someone you’d want to have a beer with. But in office, they hold a power that has historically been shown a different level of respect. 

As the first Black woman to hold the position, Vice President Harris is no longer “Kamala,” in black jeans and Converse sneakers, and Vogue — which was criticized for being too casual with its original cover — is recognizing that with a special edition of the magazine. 


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"In recognition of the enormous interest in the digital cover, and in celebration of this historic moment, we will be publishing a limited number of special edition inaugural issues," said Vogue on their website, where the issue is available for $7.99 (plus sales tax).

Vice President Harris herself reportedly preferred the second photograph, which shows her in a powder blue suit with an American flag pin on her lapel, arms crossed in front of a gold backdrop. The other photograph, in which she was wearing Converse (a campaign trail staple), was in front of a pink and green backdrop, the colors of the vice president's historically Black sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha.


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Editor-in-Chief Anna Wintour defended the choice, arguing that the editorial team felt the approachability of the initial photograph "reflected the moment" and that no promises were made to Vice President Harris. 

“Obviously we have heard and understood the reaction to the print cover and I just want to reiterate that it was absolutely not our intention to, in any way, diminish the importance of the vice president-elect’s incredible victory,” Wintour told the New York Times.  


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Published on Jan 21, 2021