Enrichment Education

NYC public schools to test students for dyslexia for first time

“By changing the way we approach dyslexia; we can unlock the untapped potential in students who may feel insecure about their dyslexia or any other language-based learning disabilities they may have," Mayor Eric Adams said.
Eric Adams
FILE – New York City Mayor Eric Adams speaks during the New York State Democratic Convention in New York, Feb. 17, 2022. Adams, a former New York City police captain, took office this year with a central focus on making the city feel safe and trying to return it to some sense of normalcy post-pandemic. But the first 3 1/2 months of his administration have been beset by a string of high-profile violent incidents, with the Tuesday, April 12, shooting on a subway train the most terrifying and public of all. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Story at a glance

  • The city’s education department will launch two pilot programs this fall within its public school system, where 80 elementary schools and 80 middle schools will receive training to identify students with dyslexia and provide support. 

  • Each student enrolled in the schools will be screened. 

  • Dyslexia affects roughly 20 percent of the population and represents 80 to 90 percent of those with learning disabilities.

New York City public school students will soon be screened for dyslexia, a learning disorder that affects the way the brain processes language.  

New York City Mayor Eric Adams (D), who struggled with dyslexia while in school, announced the initiative alongside the city’s Department of Education Chancellor David Banks on Thursday. 

“As a student, I struggled with identifying my dyslexia until long after leaving the public school system. Today, we are announcing the most comprehensive approach to supporting dyslexic students in New York City to prevent students from experiencing that disadvantage,” Adams said.  

“By changing the way we approach dyslexia, we can unlock the untapped potential in students who may feel insecure about their dyslexia or any other language-based learning disabilities they may have.” 

Dyslexia affects roughly 20 percent of the population and represents 80 to 90 percent of those with learning disabilities, according to The Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity.  

The city’s education department will launch two pilot programs beginning in the fall within its public school system, where 80 elementary schools and 80 middle schools will receive training to identify students with dyslexia and provide support.  

Additionally, by 2023 all K-12 teachers in the city’s public school system will participate in Made by Dyslexia’s two-hour introductory training. Teachers will also have access to “evidence-based reading programs” and will also receive support from embedded literacy coaches at all grade levels.  

The DOE plans to have at least one school offering specialized instruction in each city borough by 2023. 


America is changing faster than ever! Add Changing America to your Facebook or Twitter feed to stay on top of the news. 


“All students in New York and nationwide deserve the tools to succeed in the classroom,” Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) said in a statement.  

“These early screenings are a great step toward ensuring that each student is given adequate resources to achieve academic success. This new approach will help New York City public schools break down barriers, and I applaud Mayor Adams and Chancellor Banks for their work on this.” 


READ MORE STORIES FROM CHANGING AMERICA 

US DRUG OVERDOSE DEATHS HIT ANOTHER RECORD HIGH 

HOW TO PREPARE FOR THE END OF THE STUDENT LOAN PAYMENT PAUSE  

HUNDREDS OF BILLS TARGETING LGBTQ+ PEOPLE UNDER CONSIDERATION NATIONWIDE, HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN SAYS 

FLORIDA SCHOOL BOARD REJECTS PLAN TO COVER HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK PHOTOS OF ‘DON’T SAY GAY’ PROTESTS 

ANONYMOUS DONOR PAYS OFF STUDENT DEBT FOR TEXAS STUDENTS